Page 2 of 2

Re: So it looks like I've got 185Hz at 1920x1080!

PostPosted: 26 Mar 2017, 15:51
by RealNC
RLBURNSIDE wrote:
RealNC wrote:240Hz or not worth it :mrgreen:

Only half kidding. 240Hz is the only refresh rate next to 120Hz that can accurately reproduce 24/30/60 FPS content.


Hmm, curious why you would say this. With 24p and no frame interpolation, all you need is 3:3, 4:4, 5:5 pulldown and you're done. Perfect 1:1 repro of 24p due to integral multiples of the (fixed) source framerate.

I'm not sure I understand the question. There is no refresh rate between 120 and 240 that can do this.

Re: So it looks like I've got 185Hz at 1920x1080!

PostPosted: 26 Mar 2017, 16:56
by Chief Blur Buster
RealNC wrote:
RLBURNSIDE wrote:
RealNC wrote:240Hz or not worth it :mrgreen:

Only half kidding. 240Hz is the only refresh rate next to 120Hz that can accurately reproduce 24/30/60 FPS content.


Hmm, curious why you would say this. With 24p and no frame interpolation, all you need is 3:3, 4:4, 5:5 pulldown and you're done. Perfect 1:1 repro of 24p due to integral multiples of the (fixed) source framerate.

I'm not sure I understand the question. There is no refresh rate between 120 and 240 that can do this.

What you two are describing is thinking of two completely different use cases.
Both of you are correct, so let try to clarify:

The 24p Usage Case
For a display & a player (app, program, device) capable of 24p output on a sample-and-hold display -- non impulse displays -- there's really no motion-fluidity difference between 24Hz, 48Hz (2:2 pulldown), 72Hz (3:3), 96Hz(4:4), 120Hz(5:5), 240Hz(10:10 pulldown). All of them display a single frame for exactly the same duration of time (1/24sec) on a continuously shining display (Sample-and-hold) that has no visible refresh-cycle transition between identical refresh cycles (multi-pulldown situation). In other words, 24fps@24Hz and 24fps@48Hz and 24fps@72Hz (etc) can look exactly the same. Although, I should add that the higher the refresh rate, there can be other display degradations (e.g. lower color gamut), but that's a display behavior that varies depending on display -- rather than the science of sample-and-hold...

120Hz and 240Hz are the only modes available of matching 24/30/60
If your display cannot do 24p (like many computer monitors) then you are correct, 120Hz and 240Hz are the only fixed refresh rates simultaneously capable of exact intervals for 24fps material, 30fps material, and 60fps material (and includes situations where video files change framerates in mid-stream, e.g. 24fps/30fps/60fps material spliced together).

--anyway--

Regardless, "240Hz is not worth it" has no place on Blur Busters, full stop. :)
And for many reasons beyond what is already posted in this thread too.

Re: So it looks like I've got 185Hz at 1920x1080!

PostPosted: 27 Mar 2017, 00:25
by RealNC
Chief Blur Buster wrote:Regardless, "240Hz is not worth it" has no place on Blur Busters, full stop.

That's not what I wrote. It's "or not worth it". "Or", not "is." :P

Re: So it looks like I've got 185Hz at 1920x1080!

PostPosted: 27 Mar 2017, 12:07
by Chief Blur Buster
LOL -- Gotya.