NVIDIA Low Latency Mode question

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speancer
Posts: 193
Joined: 03 May 2020, 04:26
Location: Poland

Re: NVIDIA Low Latency Mode question

Post by speancer » 04 Oct 2020, 10:18

jorimt wrote:
28 Sep 2020, 07:34
speancer wrote:
28 Sep 2020, 05:33
If you're system isn't GPU-bound, the only thing LLM might theoretically do is affect frame pacing, depending on how the given engine handles the the pre-rendered frames queue, and if it allows LLM override to take effect (a LOT of games don't, and DX12/Vulkan games don't at all).

LLM "On" is typically safe to leave enabled on a gaming-capable system, GPU-bound or no.

Battle(non)sense found LLM "Ultra" slightly increased input lag in non-GPU-bound scenarios. I haven't tested that myself, so I can only guess why he found that to be the case, said guess being it caused repeat frames here and there due to its "just-in-time" delivery component acting up when the system wasn't GPU-bound, but that's up in the air.

Anyway, as I've said elsewhere, LLM is a highly overvalued setting. Even at its best, it doesn't do much to reduce input lag; typically around 1 to a little over 1 frame reduction in GPU-bound scenarios.
Thank you for clearing this matter up even further (as I asked about it before already). I keep LLM "On" for CS:GO, just for a peace of mind. And in the subject of input lag, I guess the most effective way to reduce latency even further in CS:GO would be upgrading my CPU (maybe to i7 9700K/10700K or new Ryzen 5000 series incoming?) and getting 360 Hz display (waiting for PG259QN release!) would it not? I don't think this game would benefit much from a better GPU, so upgrading to a powerful single-core performance CPU is probably the best option. I wonder how much of a difference I'd get upgrading i7 4790K @ 4.7 GHz to something like i7 10700K @ 5.0~ GHz... Most of the test I find don't really make this clear for me, as I stick to low options and low resolution, but some differences between the newer CPUs are so small that it makes the pricing gaps ridicolous (from a solely gaming-wise point of view). I imagine there could be significant improvement with 10th gen Intel over old boy like 4790K :P
disq wrote:
29 Sep 2020, 15:28
that's what i was thinking, thanks for your input @jorimt :)

and sorry @speancer for the slightly thread hijack :oops:
It's ok, I don't mind at all ;)
Tested displays: Zowie XL2546KASUS VG259QMASUS VG279QMOmen X 25fZowie XL2546 MSI MAG251RXAcer Predator XB273 XAcer Predator XB271HU
Displays to test: ASUS VG258QM • Zowie XL2540K (currently testing)

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jorimt
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Location: USA

Re: NVIDIA Low Latency Mode question

Post by jorimt » 04 Oct 2020, 11:55

speancer wrote:
04 Oct 2020, 10:18
And in the subject of input lag, I guess the most effective way to reduce latency even further in CS:GO would be upgrading my CPU (maybe to i7 9700K/10700K or new Ryzen 5000 series incoming?) and getting 360 Hz display (waiting for PG259QN release!) would it not?
Yes, for CS:GO, you want the highest single-threaded CPU performance possible, and the highest refresh rate possible (decreased scanout time) to take advantage of the higher framerates in non-GPU-bound scenarios.

As for a CPU upgrade, just look for the CPU that provides the highest increase in single-threaded performance over your previous CPU while balancing cost/core-count/overall performance ratio.
(jorimt: /jor-uhm-tee/)
Author: Blur Busters "G-SYNC 101" Series

Displays: Acer Predator XB271HU / LG 48CX OS: Windows 10 MB: ASUS ROG Maximus X Hero CPU: i7-8700k GPU: EVGA RTX 3080 FTW3 UG RAM: 32GB G.SKILL TridentZ @3200MHz

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