monitor AORUS AD27QD - can trip breaker?

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sew333
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monitor AORUS AD27QD - can trip breaker?

Post by sew333 » 19 Sep 2020, 16:50

Hello. I had a good monitor AORUS AD27QD. 6 months ago when i was sleep i left monitor on like always. When i woke in morning there was not power in house. Something tripped breaker/fuse. When i turn up breaker and power back in,monitor just refused to turn on. So monitor i guess tripped breaker somehow and make short circuit.

PC started normally. Only monitor get damaged. During night only pc was running and monitor. Other devices was off.

Is this possible that monitor can trip breaker?

Actually have good monitor.

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RealNC
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Re: monitor AORUS AD27QD - can trip breaker?

Post by RealNC » 20 Sep 2020, 06:36

Any electrical device can trip the breaker. It doesn't matter if it's a fridge or a monitor. If it's damaged or malfunctioning and results in a short-circuit, it can fry itself and trip the breaker.

However, it's also possible the damage can be caused the other way around. Like when there's a thunderstorm and you get a huge spike. This can damage a device during the short interval between the spike occurring and the breaker getting tripped. Good computer PSUs normally protect against this, at least to some extend, but monitors are obviously not getting their power from the PSU. Monitor PSUs do not normally offer very good protection against this.
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sew333
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Re: monitor AORUS AD27QD - can trip breaker?

Post by sew333 » 21 Sep 2020, 02:27

2 weeks ago something tripped 2 small circuit breakers . All electricity lights and sockets went down .Then.......i go to bathroom and saw that one of 3 halogen bulbs no lightning. So one bulb get burned.

What tripped breaker? Halogen Bulb or Seasonic psu of my pc?

Like i said pc working normally after that outage.But i am worried about my psu.

Thx for helping me. I am not cooled down<lol>.Also psu in monitor have not the same protections like my Seasonic?

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Re: monitor AORUS AD27QD - can trip breaker?

Post by RealNC » 21 Sep 2020, 10:14

I don't know. It could have been anything.
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sew333
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Re: monitor AORUS AD27QD - can trip breaker?

Post by sew333 » 21 Sep 2020, 12:24

I have Seasonic TX-750W Ultra Titanium Is this possible that ttripped breaker or more than likely it was a bulb? Pc working fine

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Re: monitor AORUS AD27QD - can trip breaker?

Post by Chief Blur Buster » 21 Sep 2020, 19:32

sew333 wrote:
21 Sep 2020, 02:27
2 weeks ago something tripped 2 small circuit breakers . All electricity lights and sockets went down .Then.......i go to bathroom and saw that one of 3 halogen bulbs no lightning. So one bulb get burned.
It is hard to say what was the culprit, and what sequence of events happened.

-- A bulb might have short circuited, causing the circuit breaker to trip. A burning-out lightbulb sometimes execute a very brief short-circuit behavior that trips a circuit breaker. (Debris inside a burning-out lightbulb can scatter/fall inside the glass sphere and short circuit, creating a bright flash and/or circuit breaker trip when it goes out. Monitor crash or defect occured upon return of power (poor tolerance of power outage).

/or/

-- A circuit got overloaded (computer, monitor, microwave, heater, etc, the whole room's power outlets might be on the same circuit) and tripped. But when you reset the circuit breaker, the cycling of the light bulb caused the lightbulb to burn out. Monitor crash or defect occured upon return of power (poor tolerance of power outage).

/or/

-- Your monitor has a short circuit and was the culprit.

Are you sure your monitor cannot turn on? Sometimes a power outage crashes the electronics in a monitor too (like a computer too), sometimes you have to unplug and replug the monitor. Complete unplug.

Try unplug and replug: Simple monitor crash from undervoltage event
That often solves the problem since the monitor may have some crashed electronics if your outage "browned-back-in" or "flickered-back-in". Imagine undervolting your CPU, same thing -- the monitor electronics may have been temporarily undervolted by a low voltage upon return from power outage. Slow repowering events can be very weird for electronics, creating a crashed-electronics situation or power-button-not-responding event. Until you completely unplug the device/computer/appliance, wait for a minute, and plug it back in.

Exercise your right to warranty: Defective power supply did not tolerate return of power
In either case, it is usually an RMAable defect since nothing else got damaged except your monitor, and power supplies in monitors need to be robust enough to tolerate unplug / power outage events / brief moments of undervoltage. Like a power bar with a switch or an uninterruptible power supply running out of battery power. So sudden loss/return of power is normal use. A sole single device that gets damaged in a simple unplug/outage when everything else isn't, I consider to be the fault of the electronic device because it was weaker tolerance of power outage than everything else in the household. A weak power supply that gets damaged in a simple (non-overvoltage) outage that damaged nothing else, is to me, considered a design defect or simply a defective product -- in that all other units are strong, and you happened to have one with a defect-weakened power supply. This tends to be more common than a sudden short circuit inside a monitor capable of tripping a circuit breaker.

More rare is a short circuit inside a monitor, but that too, is an RMAable defect. If you smell lots of bad burning plasticky smells, then that may be add more evidence of short circuit.

If something else happened (lightning) that damaged everything, or multiple devices stopped working, then sure, it isn't RMAable.
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sew333
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Joined: 13 Nov 2017, 12:45

Re: monitor AORUS AD27QD - can trip breaker?

Post by sew333 » 22 Sep 2020, 11:59

5 months ago i rma that monitor. Shop service exchange new psu inside monitor. I have new monitor 5 months now no issues.

But 3 weeks ago something tripped breaker again, i saw halogen bulb no lights in bathroom. So it was bulb or maybe psu in pc,my Seasonic TX-750? Or its doubtful that was psu in pc?


Psu in pc have better protections than psu in monitor?

Reese_SPL
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Re: monitor AORUS AD27QD - can trip breaker?

Post by Reese_SPL » 05 Oct 2020, 10:28

What country are you in? I ask because the first thing that comes to my mind is what kind of power are we dealing with here. Since some countries, like the US are 120VAC (240VAC - split phase) 60Hz while others may be 240VAC 50Hz.

If you're in the US, you could be dealing with a loss of neutral coming into the meter/breaker box of the home, or even the transformer. In which case will likely require you to consult a licensed electrician / electric utility company to check all the wiring.

I say this because of an experienced we've had with our RV which runs off a 50A 240VAC circuit. Each 120V leg together creates 240V. What happened was that we essentially lost neutral, thus allowing 240V to hit through all the electronics when there's an uneven load. (Eg, 5amps on one leg and 15amps on the other. - Technically if you have a perfect even amount of current being pulled from each leg, the lack of neutral doesn't effect anything. Though more than often we don't have such a perfect scenario) This was due to the neutral connection working itself loose overtime, causing corrosion from the heat it builds.

From that, some devices did not survive, such as a TV and the 12VDC charging system.

So I would highly suggest getting things checked out if this is a reoccurring problem, generally there's a common factor to what takes multiple things out multiple times.

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