05/22/2020 UPDATE. The IPS 240hz monitor tier list.(I've measured/tried the all) and my honest explanation why.

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RLCScontender
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Re: 04/18/2020. The IPS 240hz monitor tier list.(I've measured/tried the all) and my honest explanation why.

Post by RLCScontender » 22 May 2020, 18:39

I used twp oscilloscopes. $500 digital oscilloscope and a $80 digital osciloscope and a $40 -$80photodiode. My measurements are indicative of what i learned in my electrical engineering class in college(which I got an A on). My teacher was extremely strict, if you are off by 0.5ms on a rise time, you will get a flaming F on the class. Luckily for computers, a lot of engineering overlap with computer science. I know how to work an oscilloscope on the back of my head. it's second nature to me and me reviewing these monitors was a smooth transition.

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btw, these aren't "FULL" reviews. I'm not going to measure ergonomics, or hardware quality, or color accuracy. The purpose for me when i started this project was to see which montior is the best for gaming and g2g averages is one important indicator of it(input lag comes in next).

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no surprises here. The Asus TUF VG279QM/VG259QM is the fastest monitor period. The peak performance will annhilate the competition when it comes to gaming since at 280hz, you have a huge advantage. (reduced input lag, better motion clarity, more FPS to work with)

To read these carefully, you just can't look at those numbers. You have to look at the big picture.

if the Asus VG279QM/VG259QM was at 240hz, YES the MSI is faster since at 240hz, the g2g average is better on the MSI.

however, if the FPS is above 240hz, the VG279QM is faster and has less motion blur on fast moving objects because what is included in a higher refresh rate is less input lag, better motion clarity, and you are able to see more frames per second becauase 280hz>>>>240hz. Out of all the monitors i played on, the Asus VG279qm that i owned had the overall best performance. The higher the FPS, the better i performed.

higher refresh rate usually beats g2g average. Here's an example. the 0.3g2g average OLED but the refresh rate is les than HALF of the Asus VG279qm. g2g average becomes inconsequential if the refresh rate is lower. theat is why the asus vg279qm/vg259qm has the best peak performance out of all the monitors(even better than TN if you factor in the 280hz refresh above the 240hz refresh).

OLEd 120hz 0.3 g2g average. Notice how it's still blurry. WHY? because it has a lower refresh rate at 120hz relative to high refresh monitors. I got this from the rtings website when they reviewed this OLED. Even at 0.3 g2g, there'es still motion blur.

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tldkldrkl; Asus VG279qm/VG259QM is the fastest IPS monitor and the fastest monitor in the world right now. Peak performance was noticeable for me when i played rocket league. Why didn't I buy it?

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THOSE grainy looking dots are NOT glare from my camera to the screen. It's individual pixels. No joke

Colors. I'm extremely PICKY when it comes to picking monitors. the excellent performance didn't outweigh how grainy looking the Asus VG279qm/VG259qm was. It was too grainy for me. Then again, that's just my opinion.

also no 10 bit color depth at 240hz was the other reason why i chose the MSI over the Asus (8 bit)

Arch
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Re: 05/22/2020 UPDATE. The IPS 240hz monitor tier list.(I've measured/tried the all) and my honest explanation why.

Post by Arch » 22 May 2020, 19:55

Hello RLCSContender. I want to know something. I can get the MSI MAG251RX in 2 months or the Alienware AW2521HF immediately, how is the Alienware doing at 240hz with 60Hz games? I'm mainly playing fighting games and esport competitives games. I know the MSI does really well, I want to know about the Alienware. Thanks!

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Re: 04/18/2020. The IPS 240hz monitor tier list.(I've measured/tried the all) and my honest explanation why.

Post by Chief Blur Buster » 22 May 2020, 21:41

RLCScontender wrote:
22 May 2020, 18:39
OLEd 120hz 0.3 g2g average. Notice how it's still blurry. WHY? because it has a lower refresh rate at 120hz relative to high refresh monitors. I got this from the rtings website when they reviewed this OLED. Even at 0.3 g2g, there'es still motion blur.
MPRT is the majority of the motion blur, not GtG.

GtG corresponds to pixel transition time
MPRT corresponds more to pixel visibilty time (even for a stationary, finished transitioned pxiel)

MPRT and GtG does muddy into each other, but assuming GtG=0, then 100% of display motion blur becomes controlled by MPRT. Assuming MPRT(0-100%) it follows a very beautifully simple math formula called Blur Busters Law of 1ms MPRT(100%) translates 1 pixel of motion blur per 1000 pixels/sec.

Instant 0ms GtG will still generate lots of motion blur, because MPRT co-relates directly to pixel visibility time. If the display is not strobed, pixel stays visible for whole refresh cycle. And pixel has opportunity to generate motion blur from eye-tracking, just like www.testufo.com/eyetracking ... Most display motion blur is caused by the eye tracking, not the display itself.

The invention of using a series of stationary images to generate moving images, creates the side effect that a stationary image will necessarily be displayed for some time, creating opportunity for the static image to be blurred across your retinas, as you try to track across every single static images of every single refresh cycle.



This is display motion blur above-and-beyond real life motion. (display motion being an imperfect metaphor of real world motion, because display motion is achived by a rapid series of static images) The humankind invention of a series of static images to simulate moving images -- creates the display motion blur side effect.

From Valve Index VR Headset (0.33ms MPRT ~100%) to the typical bog-standard DELL 60Hz LCD (16.7ms MPRT ~100%)...

Ideal non-strobed displays of:

0.5ms MPRT(100%)
1000 pixels/sec has 0.5 pixels of motion blur
2000 pixels/sec has 1.0 pixels of motion blur
3000 pixels/sec has 1.5 pixels of motion blur
4000 pixels/sec has 2.0 pixels of motion blur

1ms MPRT(100%)
1000 pixels/sec has 1 pixels of motion blur
2000 pixels/sec has 2 pixels of motion blur
3000 pixels/sec has 3 pixels of motion blur
4000 pixels/sec has 4 pixels of motion blur

2ms MPRT(100%)
1000 pixels/sec has 2 pixels of motion blur
2000 pixels/sec has 4 pixels of motion blur
3000 pixels/sec has 8 pixels of motion blur
4000 pixels/sec has 16 pixels of motion blur

4ms MPRT(100%) (very close to 4.167ms for ideal 240Hz 0ms GtG display)
1000 pixels/sec has 4 pixels of motion blur
2000 pixels/sec has 8 pixels of motion blur
3000 pixels/sec has 16 pixels of motion blur
4000 pixels/sec has 32 pixels of motion blur

8ms MPRT(100%) (very close to 8.333ms for ideal 120Hz 0ms GtG display)
1000 pixels/sec has 8 pixels of motion blur
2000 pixels/sec has 16 pixels of motion blur
3000 pixels/sec has 32 pixels of motion blur
4000 pixels/sec has 64 pixels of motion blur

16ms MPRT(100%) (very close to 16.667ms for ideal 60Hz 0ms GtG display)
1000 pixels/sec has 16 pixels of motion blur
2000 pixels/sec has 32 pixels of motion blur
3000 pixels/sec has 64 pixels of motion blur
4000 pixels/sec has 128 pixels of motion blur

This follows the simple Blur Busters Law of 1ms = 1 pixel of motion blur per 1000 pixels/sec motion.

*Real numbers for 240Hz, 120Hz and 60Hz, rounded off to nearest microsecond, is 4.167ms, 8.333ms, and 16.667ms respectively. However, I use 4ms, 8ms, 16ms here, to simplify the mathematical comparisions of Blur Busters Law.

Image

However, slower GtG will "add" more motion blur and ghosting/corona above-and-beyond simple MPRT motion blur, which complicates motion blur / adds crosstalk / etc. Different humans have different sensitivities / noisefloors. Whereas GtG ghosting/coronas might be almost below the noisefloor of Human A, may be exaggerated with Human B. Vision tests don't cover a lot of amazing human vision differences, and it's amazing how different humans behave like two different oscilloscopes or two totally different cameras, despite both passing the minimum 20/20 vision standard. So GtG99% looks very different between two humans sometimes. Only instant 0ms GtG100% will help simplify that portion of that argument, but that may not happen (even for OLED...)

Nontheless, at least we know what the "ideal" is, and we already know GtG is not the main cause of display motion blur anymore. GtG isn't the cause of www.testufo.com/eyetracking .. And GtG is not the cause of www.testufo.com/persistence ... Thse optical illusions are 100% generated by persistence motion blur (MPRT motion blur), aka eye tracking based motion blur.

For a squarewave persistence, MPRT(100%) motion blur is super-easy to calculate because your eyes are in a different positions at the beginning and end of pixel visibility, assuming an analog eye-tracking vector of a constant eye-tracking motion speed, so exactly 1/60th of 1000 pixels is 16.7 pixels worth of eye movement, causing 16.7 pixels of static-pixel smearing against your moving-retina (like a moving smartphone)

However, at least we know that the "guaranteed minimum motion blur" is super-easy to calculate for perfect MPRT(100%) GtG 0ms display. So anything worse than that, will generally be additively worse than that. Also, keep in mind for a theoretical "perfect" 0ms GtG sample-and-hold display (non strobed), the usual measurement-cutoff points means MPRT(10%-90%) will usually be 80% the size of MPRT(100%), e.g. 8.333ms MPRT(100%) becomes 6.667ms MPRT(10%->90%). But that doesn't match real-world perceived motion blurring, which is why I hate the artibrary cutoff points (originally necessitiated by oscilloscope noise floors, but it makes it harder to teach display motion blur).

By using MPRT(100%) mathematics, the Blur Busters Law formula becomes super-simple as "1ms of persistence translates to 1 pixel of motion blur per 1000 pixels/sec.

Basically, eye tracking past a refresh cycle displayed stationary for 1/60sec, is like a camera set to 1/60sec shutter and panning the camera sideways at the distance equivalent of 1/60th of 1000 pixels/sec.

Persistence blurring is largely MPRT related blur.

The MPRT(100%) of a non-strobed display will generally be frame duration (within refresh rate capability, fixed Hz divisible, or within VRR range) for non-strobed displays.

The MPRT(100%) of a strobed display (framerate=Hz) will generally be the strobe flash length (assuming crosstalk don't trigger cutoff points)

Thusly, for theoretical ideal perfect displays (GtG = 0ms for all color combos)
Perfect 120fps @ 120Hz non-strobed = 8.333ms MPRT(100%)
Perfect 144fps @ 144Hz non-strobed = 6.994ms MPRT(100%)
Perfect 60fps @ 60Hz non-strobed = 16.667ms MPRT(100%)
Perfect 60fps @ 120Hz non-strobed = 16.667ms MPRT(100%)
Perfect 100fps @ VRR non-strobed = 10.000ms MPRT(100%)
Perfect 120fps @ 120Hz strobed 1ms flash = 1ms MPRT(100%)
Perfect 100fps @ 100Hz strobed 1ms flash = 1ms MPRT(100%)
Perfect 60fps @ 60Hz strobed 1ms flash = 1ms MPRT(100%)
Perfect 120fps @ 120Hz strobed 2ms flash = 2ms MPRT(100%)
Perfect 100fps @ 100Hz strobed 2ms flash = 2ms MPRT(100%)
Perfect 60fps @ 60Hz strobed 2ms flash = 2ms MPRT(100%)

So yes, perfect displays still have motion blur! Because of the finite static pixel visibility time (the cause of persistence blurring).

How do we fix display motion blur? Easy!
1. Shorten pixel visibility time.

How?
A. Increased frame rate at increased refresh rate (non-strobed approach of motion blur elimination; or
B. Add black time between refresh cycles (strobing approach of motion blur elimination)

Real life doesn't strobe, so emulating real life perfection (important for VR or reality applications), will ideally use approach (A). The problem is that 1ms MPRT will require one thousand unique frames with no black periods in between. Thus, 1000fps at 1000Hz.

Strobing is just a humankind bandaid for now, because real life doesn't strobe. It is an excellent solution, but other approaches will be needed to achieve anything remotely close to "retina motion quality" for anything remotely reaching four-sigma population, lest dream of five-sigma population.

Real life is infinite frame rate, and no display-forced eyetracking motion blur above-and-beyond real life blur. We can't yet accomplish unobtainium framerates/refreshrates yet to better simulate analog framerateless motion. However, it is the Blur Busters Holy Grail, as seen in flagship articles on Blur Busters:

- Blur Busters Law: The Amazing Journey To Future 1000Hz Displays
- Frame Rate Amplification Technologies (cheap 1000fps GPUs)
- The Stroboscopic Effect of Finite Frame Rates

Yesterday's scientists/researchers did not truly understand this because we never had LCDs/OLEDs/etc fast enough to test the pros/cons of these out -- and now researchers have unamiously agreed on the major causes of display motion blur. Blur Busters simply was the Cole Notes a little bit ahead of some less-knowledgeable parts of the inustry.
Head of Blur Busters - BlurBusters.com | TestUFO.com | Follow @BlurBusters on Twitter

       To support Blur Busters:
       • Official List of Best Gaming Monitors
       • List of G-SYNC Monitors
       • List of FreeSync Monitors
       • List of Ultrawide Monitors

Oevi
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Joined: 17 May 2020, 02:08

Re: 04/18/2020. The IPS 240hz monitor tier list.(I've measured/tried the all) and my honest explanation why.

Post by Oevi » 23 May 2020, 05:52

RLCScontender wrote:
22 May 2020, 18:39

tldkldrkl; Asus VG279qm/VG259QM is the fastest IPS monitor and the fastest monitor in the world right now. Peak performance was noticeable for me when i played rocket league. Why didn't I buy it?
So that does mean, if i reach 280fps ingame, there is not a single other monitor which would give me better perfomance in competetive games like cs:go, valorant etc. ? Not even a tn panel?

enescelik
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Joined: 15 Apr 2020, 18:35

Re: 05/22/2020 UPDATE. The IPS 240hz monitor tier list.(I've measured/tried the all) and my honest explanation why.

Post by enescelik » 23 May 2020, 06:05

Would vg259qm be too bad on below 200 fps? I want to get this monitor because it's really cheap compared to mag251rx and xg270. However I don't really get 200+ fps with my current setup. I want to get a 240 hz monitor for a future upgrade. I play generally league and rarely valorant or variety. Is it too bad below 200fps? BTW thanks rlcscontender 1. because of your reviews and 2. you actually suggest a product out of your reviews. I kinda feel disappointed when I don't see a buying suggestion with a lot of scientific analysis of monitors in websites.

RLCScontender
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Joined: 24 Mar 2020, 14:14

Re: 04/18/2020. The IPS 240hz monitor tier list.(I've measured/tried the all) and my honest explanation why.

Post by RLCScontender » 23 May 2020, 07:46

Oevi wrote:
23 May 2020, 05:52
RLCScontender wrote:
22 May 2020, 18:39

tldkldrkl; Asus VG279qm/VG259QM is the fastest IPS monitor and the fastest monitor in the world right now. Peak performance was noticeable for me when i played rocket league. Why didn't I buy it?
So that does mean, if i reach 280fps ingame, there is not a single other monitor which would give me better perfomance in competetive games like cs:go, valorant etc. ? Not even a tn panel?
yes, from my personal anecdote playing rocket league. it was probably the best experience i've ever had playing the game. The #1 thing i noticed the most was when i was moving my camera around. The microstuttering dissipates more quickly, there was less motion blur, and i felt that there was less input lag and better motion clarity. I could also play faster knowing that i have +40 FPS advantage over everyone. . Basically, i SAW things more, moreso than any 240hz monitor. Is it a gamebchanging for 90% of people? NO, but if you are ELITE at the game, like top 10-5%, that extra edge will add up over time and maximize your potential. that's how i felt when i tried the asus. It's just the grainy looking colors that annoyed me, on top of a dead pixel(i bought ti "like new" on amazon warehouse.

if the FPS drops under 240hz though, then yeah, the Asus is equivalent to a slow TN monitor since 3.6-3.8 g2g is fairly decent and will give you a good experience, but what if you are going against a TN user who has a faster monitor of equal skill? He has better peak performance than you and thus will have a slight advantage. If we're talkign about highlyly competitive gameplay, u want that extra edge as much as you want.



a lot of ppl are apprehensive about overclocking it because the monitor isnt' fast enough for 280hz. Pixel smearing from my perspective was not noticeable at all. hell, i even tried OD 100 at 280hz FPS and the overshoot was fairly hard to see. (although most objects glowed, so if u find that distracting, drop down to OD 80)

RLCScontender
Posts: 313
Joined: 24 Mar 2020, 14:14

Re: 04/18/2020. The IPS 240hz monitor tier list.(I've measured/tried the all) and my honest explanation why.

Post by RLCScontender » 23 May 2020, 07:57

Chief Blur Buster wrote:
22 May 2020, 21:41
RLCScontender wrote:
22 May 2020, 18:39
OLEd 120hz 0.3 g2g average. Notice how it's still blurry. WHY? because it has a lower refresh rate at 120hz relative to high refresh monitors. I got this from the rtings website when they reviewed this OLED. Even at 0.3 g2g, there'es still motion blur.
MPRT is the majority of the motion blur, not GtG.

GtG corresponds to pixel transition time
MPRT corresponds more to pixel visibilty time (even for a stationary, finished transitioned pxiel)

MPRT and GtG does muddy into each other, but assuming GtG=0, then 100% of display motion blur becomes controlled by MPRT. Assuming MPRT(0-100%) it follows a very beautifully simple math formula called Blur Busters Law of 1ms MPRT(100%) translates 1 pixel of motion blur per 1000 pixels/sec.

Instant 0ms GtG will still generate lots of motion blur, because MPRT co-relates directly to pixel visibility time. If the display is not strobed, pixel stays visible for whole refresh cycle. And pixel has opportunity to generate motion blur from eye-tracking, just like www.testufo.com/eyetracking ... Most display motion blur is caused by the eye tracking, not the display itself.

The invention of using a series of stationary images to generate moving images, creates the side effect that a stationary image will necessarily be displayed for some time, creating opportunity for the static image to be blurred across your retinas, as you try to track across every single static images of every single refresh cycle.



This is display motion blur above-and-beyond real life motion. (display motion being an imperfect metaphor of real world motion, because display motion is achived by a rapid series of static images) The humankind invention of a series of static images to simulate moving images -- creates the display motion blur side effect.

From Valve Index VR Headset (0.33ms MPRT ~100%) to the typical bog-standard DELL 60Hz LCD (16.7ms MPRT ~100%)...

Ideal non-strobed displays of:

0.5ms MPRT(100%)
1000 pixels/sec has 0.5 pixels of motion blur
2000 pixels/sec has 1.0 pixels of motion blur
3000 pixels/sec has 1.5 pixels of motion blur
4000 pixels/sec has 2.0 pixels of motion blur

1ms MPRT(100%)
1000 pixels/sec has 1 pixels of motion blur
2000 pixels/sec has 2 pixels of motion blur
3000 pixels/sec has 3 pixels of motion blur
4000 pixels/sec has 4 pixels of motion blur

2ms MPRT(100%)
1000 pixels/sec has 2 pixels of motion blur
2000 pixels/sec has 4 pixels of motion blur
3000 pixels/sec has 8 pixels of motion blur
4000 pixels/sec has 16 pixels of motion blur

4ms MPRT(100%) (very close to 4.167ms for ideal 240Hz 0ms GtG display)
1000 pixels/sec has 4 pixels of motion blur
2000 pixels/sec has 8 pixels of motion blur
3000 pixels/sec has 16 pixels of motion blur
4000 pixels/sec has 32 pixels of motion blur

8ms MPRT(100%) (very close to 8.333ms for ideal 120Hz 0ms GtG display)
1000 pixels/sec has 8 pixels of motion blur
2000 pixels/sec has 16 pixels of motion blur
3000 pixels/sec has 32 pixels of motion blur
4000 pixels/sec has 64 pixels of motion blur

16ms MPRT(100%) (very close to 16.667ms for ideal 60Hz 0ms GtG display)
1000 pixels/sec has 16 pixels of motion blur
2000 pixels/sec has 32 pixels of motion blur
3000 pixels/sec has 64 pixels of motion blur
4000 pixels/sec has 128 pixels of motion blur

This follows the simple Blur Busters Law of 1ms = 1 pixel of motion blur per 1000 pixels/sec motion.

*Real numbers for 240Hz, 120Hz and 60Hz, rounded off to nearest microsecond, is 4.167ms, 8.333ms, and 16.667ms respectively. However, I use 4ms, 8ms, 16ms here, to simplify the mathematical comparisions of Blur Busters Law.

Image

However, slower GtG will "add" more motion blur and ghosting/corona above-and-beyond simple MPRT motion blur, which complicates motion blur / adds crosstalk / etc. Different humans have different sensitivities / noisefloors. Whereas GtG ghosting/coronas might be almost below the noisefloor of Human A, may be exaggerated with Human B. Vision tests don't cover a lot of amazing human vision differences, and it's amazing how different humans behave like two different oscilloscopes or two totally different cameras, despite both passing the minimum 20/20 vision standard. So GtG99% looks very different between two humans sometimes. Only instant 0ms GtG100% will help simplify that portion of that argument, but that may not happen (even for OLED...)

Nontheless, at least we know what the "ideal" is, and we already know GtG is not the main cause of display motion blur anymore. GtG isn't the cause of www.testufo.com/eyetracking .. And GtG is not the cause of www.testufo.com/persistence ... Thse optical illusions are 100% generated by persistence motion blur (MPRT motion blur), aka eye tracking based motion blur.

For a squarewave persistence, MPRT(100%) motion blur is super-easy to calculate because your eyes are in a different positions at the beginning and end of pixel visibility, assuming an analog eye-tracking vector of a constant eye-tracking motion speed, so exactly 1/60th of 1000 pixels is 16.7 pixels worth of eye movement, causing 16.7 pixels of static-pixel smearing against your moving-retina (like a moving smartphone)

However, at least we know that the "guaranteed minimum motion blur" is super-easy to calculate for perfect MPRT(100%) GtG 0ms display. So anything worse than that, will generally be additively worse than that. Also, keep in mind for a theoretical "perfect" 0ms GtG sample-and-hold display (non strobed), the usual measurement-cutoff points means MPRT(10%-90%) will usually be 80% the size of MPRT(100%), e.g. 8.333ms MPRT(100%) becomes 6.667ms MPRT(10%->90%). But that doesn't match real-world perceived motion blurring, which is why I hate the artibrary cutoff points (originally necessitiated by oscilloscope noise floors, but it makes it harder to teach display motion blur).

By using MPRT(100%) mathematics, the Blur Busters Law formula becomes super-simple as "1ms of persistence translates to 1 pixel of motion blur per 1000 pixels/sec.

Basically, eye tracking past a refresh cycle displayed stationary for 1/60sec, is like a camera set to 1/60sec shutter and panning the camera sideways at the distance equivalent of 1/60th of 1000 pixels/sec.

Persistence blurring is largely MPRT related blur.

The MPRT(100%) of a non-strobed display will generally be frame duration (within refresh rate capability, fixed Hz divisible, or within VRR range) for non-strobed displays.

The MPRT(100%) of a strobed display (framerate=Hz) will generally be the strobe flash length (assuming crosstalk don't trigger cutoff points)

Thusly, for theoretical ideal perfect displays (GtG = 0ms for all color combos)
Perfect 120fps @ 120Hz non-strobed = 8.333ms MPRT(100%)
Perfect 144fps @ 144Hz non-strobed = 6.994ms MPRT(100%)
Perfect 60fps @ 60Hz non-strobed = 16.667ms MPRT(100%)
Perfect 60fps @ 120Hz non-strobed = 16.667ms MPRT(100%)
Perfect 100fps @ VRR non-strobed = 10.000ms MPRT(100%)
Perfect 120fps @ 120Hz strobed 1ms flash = 1ms MPRT(100%)
Perfect 100fps @ 100Hz strobed 1ms flash = 1ms MPRT(100%)
Perfect 60fps @ 60Hz strobed 1ms flash = 1ms MPRT(100%)
Perfect 120fps @ 120Hz strobed 2ms flash = 2ms MPRT(100%)
Perfect 100fps @ 100Hz strobed 2ms flash = 2ms MPRT(100%)
Perfect 60fps @ 60Hz strobed 2ms flash = 2ms MPRT(100%)

So yes, perfect displays still have motion blur! Because of the finite static pixel visibility time (the cause of persistence blurring).

How do we fix display motion blur? Easy!
1. Shorten pixel visibility time.

How?
A. Increased frame rate at increased refresh rate (non-strobed approach of motion blur elimination; or
B. Add black time between refresh cycles (strobing approach of motion blur elimination)

Real life doesn't strobe, so emulating real life perfection (important for VR or reality applications), will ideally use approach (A). The problem is that 1ms MPRT will require one thousand unique frames with no black periods in between. Thus, 1000fps at 1000Hz.

Strobing is just a humankind bandaid for now, because real life doesn't strobe. It is an excellent solution, but other approaches will be needed to achieve anything remotely close to "retina motion quality" for anything remotely reaching four-sigma population, lest dream of five-sigma population.

Real life is infinite frame rate, and no display-forced eyetracking motion blur above-and-beyond real life blur. We can't yet accomplish unobtainium framerates/refreshrates yet to better simulate analog framerateless motion. However, it is the Blur Busters Holy Grail, as seen in flagship articles on Blur Busters:

- Blur Busters Law: The Amazing Journey To Future 1000Hz Displays
- Frame Rate Amplification Technologies (cheap 1000fps GPUs)
- The Stroboscopic Effect of Finite Frame Rates

Yesterday's scientists/researchers did not truly understand this because we never had LCDs/OLEDs/etc fast enough to test the pros/cons of these out -- and now researchers have unamiously agreed on the major causes of display motion blur. Blur Busters simply was the Cole Notes a little bit ahead of some less-knowledgeable parts of the inustry.
'This was a good read. I KNEW that when i played on that 280hz monitor, that i just "saw" things more but it was hard to understand why considering that the 280hz was a 4ms g2g monitor yet i had a better experience playing it compared to the MSI at 240h . And bingo, based off what i've read here, this confirmed what i noticed that the added refresh and the FPS to match it made the gameplay more smooth and gave me better clarity when playing. So yes, my assumptions were correct that the extra refresh and the added FPS matching that gave a better overall experience when it comes to playing fast paced video games even if it has a slower g2g average.

i always assumed MPRT only factored in when you are strobing because "1ms" MPRT so i thought that was a measurement exclusively to backlight strobing.


Still, i was shocked at looking at the 120hz OLED w/ 0.3 g2g that the image was blurry, moreso compared to most 240hz monitors. I wonder if OLED will ever reach 240hz and keeps the 0.1-0.3 g2g that would be the day where i will jump ship. As of right now, the price doesnt' justify it.

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RedCloudFuneral
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Re: 05/22/2020 UPDATE. The IPS 240hz monitor tier list.(I've measured/tried the all) and my honest explanation why.

Post by RedCloudFuneral » 23 May 2020, 13:25

Have you tried overclocking the other monitors to 280hz?

iopq
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Joined: 23 May 2020, 10:06

Re: 05/22/2020 UPDATE. The IPS 240hz monitor tier list.(I've measured/tried the all) and my honest explanation why.

Post by iopq » 24 May 2020, 02:00

Does ELMB-sync actually work correctly? I've seen claims it doesn't add anything, but it's hard for me to read every post in this thread

RLCScontender
Posts: 313
Joined: 24 Mar 2020, 14:14

Re: 05/22/2020 UPDATE. The IPS 240hz monitor tier list.(I've measured/tried the all) and my honest explanation why.

Post by RLCScontender » 24 May 2020, 12:46

iopq wrote:
24 May 2020, 02:00
Does ELMB-sync actually work correctly? I've seen claims it doesn't add anything, but it's hard for me to read every post in this thread
Depends what monitor you have and what overdrive setting its stuck on. In my opinion, it's virtually useless and a marketing gimmick. The issues with ELMB-SYNC is mainly because they won't allow you to change overdrive and 9x out of 10, it's almost/always stuck in an overdrive setting where it's unplayable. Not only that but 1/3 1/3 1/3 of your screen has varying crosstalk aggression and this comes from panel variance. My ROG strix XG279q has decent crosstalk at 1/3 bottom, but the upper 2/3 was annoying.

ELMB-SYNC for the Asus VG279qm/VG259qm is stuck between OD 80 OD 100 so unless your FPS is 240hz or higher, i really don't recommend using it. The crosstalk(double image) is very aggressive and in my opinion not worth using from 220hz and below and the crosstalk is least aggressive at 270-280hz.

elmb-sync is never free. There is an input lag penalty you have to get used to if you turn it on. But the trade off is basically worth it. No tearing and virtually no ghostin especially if the FPS is 280hz. In practice, i didn't really notice it but after moving my camera around at a fast paced, the tearing and clarity on fast moving objects was very noticeable to the piont where i can react sub-consciously in a faster manner.

it's definitely a gamechanger but your brain has to get used to the input lag penalty. Me personally, i never had to because i don't use a mouse and keyboard to play, i use a ps4 controller wired. All i have to do is play it on bluetooth and the input lag is basically mitigated.

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