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Asus ROG PG258Q (240Hz) vs AOC Agon AG251FZ (240Hz)

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Asus ROG PG258Q (240Hz) vs AOC Agon AG251FZ (240Hz)

Postby verllar » 19 Sep 2017, 10:05

I cant decide between two, which one is smoother, better at colours etc? (I dont need g-sync i have stable fps)
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Re: Asus ROG PG258Q (240Hz) vs AOC Agon AG251FZ (240Hz)

Postby Chief Blur Buster » 19 Sep 2017, 11:30

FYI, the TFTCentral review showed that PG258Q had clearer-looking 240Hz motion than the AG251FZ. (Even without using G-SYNC)

Credit: TFTCentral review of PG258Q

They use the Blur Busters pursuit camera testing method (peer reviewed and used by several sites) which gives you WYSIWYG motion blur photos.

Image

240Hz pushes LCD limits and the use of very good overdrive is necessary to max-out 240Hz clarity. It appears that ASUS/NVIDIA did a better job at 240Hz overdrive tables than AOC did. Also, the AOC doesn't have a MBR mode (strobe backlight mode) like the ASUS ULMB mode. For more information, see Motion Blur Reduction. Also, AOC is easier to get in Europe, than in USA. As a result, if you can afford it, you'd lean Asus for this particular model.

You can buy via TFTCentral's Amazon link (support TFTCentral) or via our BlurBusters links (support Blur Busters)

* ASUS ROG PG258Q - 240Hz / G-SYNC / ULMB
* AOC Agon AG251FZ - 240Hz / FreeSync

That said, NVIDIA does a kick-ass job of calibration for all of their G-SYNC monitor help they do to monitor manufacturers, and I expect AOC G-SYNC models to be superior to AOC FreeSync models. That's one of the things I really noticed when it comes to NVIDIA G-SYNC -- they also provide good overdrive calibration that maxes-out the clarity of the LCDs. For AOC's G-SYNC monitor, which will almost certainly have much clearer 240Hz capability, see AOC AG251FG

There are manufacturers that do a great job without NVIDIA, but the existence of G-SYNC/ULMB generally also means a better-than-average job of overdrive calibration to max-out LCD motion clarity (for both non-strobed and strobed modes).
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Re: Asus ROG PG258Q (240Hz) vs AOC Agon AG251FZ (240Hz)

Postby verllar » 19 Sep 2017, 11:35

Chief Blur Buster wrote:FYI, the TFTCentral review showed that PG258Q had clearer-looking 240Hz motion than the AG251FZ. (Even without using G-SYNC)

Credit: TFTCentral review of PG258Q

They use the Blur Busters pursuit camera testing method (peer reviewed and used by several sites) which gives you WYSIWYG motion blur photos.

Image

240Hz pushes LCD limits and the use of very good overdrive is necessary to max-out 240Hz clarity. It appears that ASUS/NVIDIA did a better job at 240Hz overdrive tables than AOC did. Also, the AOC doesn't have a MBR mode (strobe backlight mode) like the ASUS ULMB mode. For more information, see Motion Blur Reduction. Also, AOC is easier to get in Europe, than in USA. As a result, if you can afford it, you'd lean Asus for this particular model.

You can buy via TFTCentral's Amazon link (support TFTCentral) or via our BlurBusters links (support Blur Busters)

* ASUS ROG PG258Q - 240Hz / G-SYNC / ULMB
* AOC Agon AG251FZ - 240Hz / FreeSync

That said, NVIDIA does a kick-ass job of calibration for all of their G-SYNC monitor help they do to monitor manufacturers, and I expect AOC G-SYNC models to be superior to AOC FreeSync models. That's one of the things I really noticed when it comes to NVIDIA G-SYNC -- they also provide good overdrive calibration that maxes-out the clarity of the LCDs. For AOC's G-SYNC monitor, which will almost certainly have much clearer 240Hz capability, see AOC AG251FG


So g-sync is doing other work than only "adds smooth if you dont have enough fps as hz"?
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Re: Asus ROG PG258Q (240Hz) vs AOC Agon AG251FZ (240Hz)

Postby Chief Blur Buster » 19 Sep 2017, 11:44

verllar wrote:So g-sync is doing other work than only "adds smooth if you dont have enough fps as hz"?

Not exactly. NVIDIA often also does non-GSYNC work for GSYNC monitors too.
-- Better non-GSYNC modes (e.g. improved overdrive for non-GSYNC 240Hz)
-- Better strobed modes (e.g. the existence of ULMB, and good NVIDIA calibration for low strobe crosstalk)
etc.

...G-SYNC monitors mean some of the monitor's technology is "manufactured" by NVIDIA
NVIDIA is essentially doing a lot of design work for the monitor manufacturer -- in many cases, writing nearly the entire firmware for the monitor for the monitor manufacturer. Traditionally (over the last few years), it usually ends up being better work than what the monitor manufacturer would have done by themselves.

...Cost of G-SYNC / FreeSync
Yeah, G-SYNC is way more expensive than FreeSync, but that extra does often bring those extra non-G-SYNC benefits for those who want them. NVIDIA, the inventors of LightBoost, the first good strobe backlight, have greatly refined ULMB to be brighter and more colorful, while working to reduce lag (compared to original LightBoost).

...Input Lag Considerations
Also, from the perspective of lag -- I've noticed from ourselves, and multiple testers, some GSYNC monitors usually are lower-lag (even in non-GSYNC mode). This is because NVIDIA generally focuses on real-time scanout where possible for TN panels (scanline buffer processing) while some monitor manufacturers still buffer their refresh cycles (full framebuffer processing). Realtime scanout is outputting the pixels while they come off the wire (video cables) without prebuffering. In eSports, you want realtime scanout (Also called "Instant Mode"). I don't currently know how low-lag the AOC is, but it's another thing that I've noticed NVIDIA generally does. Not a hard-and-fast rule, and realtime scanout not always possible (it's hard on VA panels, easier on TN panels), but I've still seen TN panels *still* do full refresh cycle prebuffering (ugh). It's the standard way to go in eSports-targeted monitors nowadays, and I'd trust TN-panel G-SYNC latency to be much more consistently realtime-scanout-based (as lagless as LCD pixel response allows!) without needing to do lag tests.

...AMD also provides paid FreeSync services to monitor manufactures too, but it's not mandatory
I understand that AMD is doing more and more work (on offer), and 240Hz FreeSync monitors are incredibly low lag too. Though AMD's contracting/assistance or AMD certification (For that AMD stamp of approval) for monitor manufacturers is non-mandatory for FreeSync unlike for G-SYNC monitors, and FreeSync monitors can be essentially done without AMD's involvement (FreeSync is essentially the same thing as VESA Adaptive-Sync and HDMI 2.1 Game Mode VRR -- you might lose the rights to have AMD certification, but it'd still be 100% compatible with FreeSync without the monitor manufacturer needing to pay AMD.

FreeSync is a great technology and I've seen really great FreeSync monitors too, but it's also useful to understand what work goes into a G-SYNC and a FreeSync monitor -- and the cost premium of G-SYNC actually also brings some non-G-SYNC extras to the table. If you don't use G-SYNC nor FreeSync, the "extras" (including better motion clarity) may or may not actually matter to you.
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Re: Asus ROG PG258Q (240Hz) vs AOC Agon AG251FZ (240Hz)

Postby verllar » 19 Sep 2017, 12:26

Chief Blur Buster wrote:
verllar wrote:So g-sync is doing other work than only "adds smooth if you dont have enough fps as hz"?

Not exactly. NVIDIA often also does non-GSYNC work for GSYNC monitors too.
-- Better non-GSYNC modes (e.g. improved overdrive for non-GSYNC 240Hz)
-- Better strobed modes (e.g. the existence of ULMB, and good NVIDIA calibration for low strobe crosstalk)
etc.

...G-SYNC monitors mean some of the monitor's technology is "manufactured" by NVIDIA
NVIDIA is essentially doing a lot of design work for the monitor manufacturer -- in many cases, writing nearly the entire firmware for the monitor for the monitor manufacturer. Traditionally (over the last few years), it usually ends up being better work than what the monitor manufacturer would have done by themselves.

...Cost of G-SYNC / FreeSync
Yeah, G-SYNC is way more expensive than FreeSync, but that extra does often bring those extra non-G-SYNC benefits for those who want them. NVIDIA, the inventors of LightBoost, the first good strobe backlight, have greatly refined ULMB to be brighter and more colorful, while working to reduce lag (compared to original LightBoost).

...Input Lag Considerations
Also, from the perspective of lag -- I've noticed from ourselves, and multiple testers, some GSYNC monitors usually are lower-lag (even in non-GSYNC mode). This is because NVIDIA generally focuses on real-time scanout where possible for TN panels (scanline buffer processing) while some monitor manufacturers still buffer their refresh cycles (full framebuffer processing). Realtime scanout is outputting the pixels while they come off the wire (video cables) without prebuffering. In eSports, you want realtime scanout (Also called "Instant Mode"). I don't currently know how low-lag the AOC is, but it's another thing that I've noticed NVIDIA generally does. Not a hard-and-fast rule, and realtime scanout not always possible (it's hard on VA panels, easier on TN panels), but I've still seen TN panels *still* do full refresh cycle prebuffering (ugh). It's the standard way to go in eSports-targeted monitors nowadays, and I'd trust TN-panel G-SYNC latency to be much more consistently realtime-scanout-based (as lagless as LCD pixel response allows!) without needing to do lag tests.

...AMD also provides paid FreeSync services to monitor manufactures too, but it's not mandatory
I understand that AMD is doing more and more work (on offer), and 240Hz FreeSync monitors are incredibly low lag too. Though AMD's contracting/assistance or AMD certification (For that AMD stamp of approval) for monitor manufacturers is non-mandatory for FreeSync unlike for G-SYNC monitors, and FreeSync monitors can be essentially done without AMD's involvement (FreeSync is essentially the same thing as VESA Adaptive-Sync and HDMI 2.1 Game Mode VRR -- you might lose the rights to have AMD certification, but it'd still be 100% compatible with FreeSync without the monitor manufacturer needing to pay AMD.

FreeSync is a great technology and I've seen really great FreeSync monitors too, but it's also useful to understand what work goes into a G-SYNC and a FreeSync monitor -- and the cost premium of G-SYNC actually also brings some non-G-SYNC extras to the table. If you don't use G-SYNC nor FreeSync, the "extras" (including better motion clarity) may or may not actually matter to you.


What you can say about Acer XB2522Q bmiprz against the asus 240hz?
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Re: Asus ROG PG258Q (240Hz) vs AOC Agon AG251FZ (240Hz)

Postby Chief Blur Buster » 19 Sep 2017, 12:32

Blur Busters' Jorim Tapley tested the Acer XB252Q as part of the extensive 240Hz G-SYNC Input Lag Tests.

There are also additional (non-GSYNC) pursuit camera photos here. The good one is:

Image

...Which is much clearer than anything you'd see non-strobed of www.testufo.com/ghosting on any 60Hz, 120Hz, 144Hz or 165Hz monitor.

(We are currently testing a new monitor testing workflow for upcoming monitors)
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Re: Asus ROG PG258Q (240Hz) vs AOC Agon AG251FZ (240Hz)

Postby jorimt » 19 Sep 2017, 12:52

verllar wrote:What you can say about Acer XB2522Q bmiprz against the asus 240hz?

Both have the same panel, both appear to have equal overdrive implementations, so the only real difference between the two is the brand, and the chassis (pick what you like the look/exclusive features [OSD layout, etc.] of).

Though the ASUS appears to be more expensive out of the two, at Amazon at least (not sure why):
Acer Predator XB252Q
ASUS ROG SWIFT PG258Q
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Re: Asus ROG PG258Q (240Hz) vs AOC Agon AG251FZ (240Hz)

Postby verllar » 19 Sep 2017, 13:34

jorimt wrote:
verllar wrote:What you can say about Acer XB2522Q bmiprz against the asus 240hz?

Both have the same panel, both appear to have equal overdrive implementations, so the only real difference between the two is the brand, and the chassis (pick what you like the look/exclusive features [OSD layout, etc.] of).

Though the ASUS appears to be more expensive out of the two, at Amazon at least (not sure why):
Acer Predator XB252Q
ASUS ROG SWIFT PG258Q


So same smooth as asus? :)
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Re: Asus ROG PG258Q (240Hz) vs AOC Agon AG251FZ (240Hz)

Postby jorimt » 19 Sep 2017, 13:39

Again, they're the exact same 240Hz G-SYNC/ULMB panel with the exact same performance, they are just two different brands (pick the one you like the look/price of better).
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