Blur Busters Forums

Who you gonna call? The Blur Busters! For Everything Better Than 60Hz™ Skip to content

Another "help me choose" thread!

Everything about displays and monitors. 120Hz, 144Hz, 240Hz, 4K, 1440p, input lag, display shopping, monitor purchase decisions, compare, versus, debate, and more. Questions? Just ask!

Another "help me choose" thread!

Postby SingleMaltScot » 06 Feb 2019, 14:32

I hate to start one of these “what should I buy” threads, but unfortunately I’ve hit the wall with research and reached a point of indecision.

This website and forum are great and have been a huge help as I try to formulate an upgrade plan. Unfortunately the world of monitors is a deep rabbit hole once you start researching.

I currently have an older Acer XB270HA monitor. This is a 27” TN screen with 144 Hz and G-sync. The monitor has ULMB, however I consider it to be unusable, even in a dark room due to the loss in brightness. Dark levels in games become unplayable.
I do like the smooth connected feeling that comes from ULMB, however I’m generally good as long as refresh rate and framerate stay above 100 fps.
I’m using a 3 year old I7 processor, and graphics is via a RTX2080.

I started thinking about upgrading after seeing a few monitors in store. Specifically the newer IPS screens look significantly better than my older TN (calibrated using a
Spyder 3). Also, I’m quite drawn to the ultrawide format as it seems very immersive.

I don’t play competitively anymore, but I am quite sensitive to motion blur and tearing as I feel it breaks the sense of immersion. Mostly I stick with first person and third person single player these days.

I narrowed my choices down to the following:

1. One of the newer IPS 27” screens with a minimum 144 hz and 2560x1440 such as the Acer XB271HU or the Asus PG279QZ.
2. Wait for the LG34GK950F to be available in Canada. Currently can’t buy this model without importing, which I’m reluctant to do due to panel lottery. The reason I was interested in this one, as opposed to the other 1440 ultrawides, is that it seems to have an option to run LG’s version of motion blur reduction and reports indicate it plays well with g-sync using the latest drivers.
3. The last choice is sit out for another year or two hoping better options become available.

My biggest concern is that when I move from 1080p to 1440 or even worse 1440 ultrawide that the drop in framerates is going to be very noticeable as I expect it will pull my average framerates below 100 on newer titles. In general I saw a lot of positive comments from people with the upgrade to 1440, however I like being able to play at Ultra settings and not worry too much about low framerates. I’ve looked at the monitors in-store, however they are usually not setup in a way that would provide much of a meaningful evaluation.

Just looking for any thoughts or wisdom that can help me formulate my upgrade path from here.

Thx.
David
SingleMaltScot
 
Posts: 2
Joined: 06 Feb 2019, 14:29

Re: Another "help me choose" thread!

Postby Chief Blur Buster » 06 Feb 2019, 18:47

SingleMaltScot wrote:I started thinking about upgrading after seeing a few monitors in store. Specifically the newer IPS screens look significantly better than my older TN (calibrated using a Spyder 3). Also, I’m quite drawn to the ultrawide format as it seems very immersive.

My experience is some newer TN monitors can have as good colors as IPS with the sole exception of worse viewing angles. So if you're a motion-blur-sensitive person, don't dismiss TN entirely. It depends on the monitor, though. How important is motion blur versus color? Maybe IPS is the right choice for you, but you have to weigh the variables.

SingleMaltScot wrote:I hate to start one of these “what should I buy” threads, but unfortunately I’ve hit the wall with research and reached a point of indecision.

If you have a $1K budget, why not the Lenovo Y27gq monitor? The 0.5ms 1440p 240Hz GSYNC monitor.

SingleMaltScot wrote:I currently have an older Acer XB270HA monitor. This is a 27” TN screen with 144 Hz and G-sync. The monitor has ULMB, however I consider it to be unusable, even in a dark room due to the loss in brightness. Dark levels in games become unplayable.

The ULMB in some newer monitors are approximately 3x brighter. It depends on the monitor though.
However, sheer framerate can be the motion blur reduction method instead; 200fps has half the motion blur of 100fps.

The slower pixel response of IPS means you'll need maybe 120fps-144fps to have roughly the same motion blur of a 100fps TN. They are quite similar, but the slower pixel response does add a slight amount of extra blur as the frametimes start to approach GtG-time (144ffps = 6.9ms frametime = very close to IPS GtG = becomes noticeable motion blur bottleneck). When GtG becomes more than half a refreshtime on a VRR monitor, it can begin to really noticeably bottleneck motion blur. Keep this in mind when purchasing an IPS panel, if you have a motion blur sensitivity. You will want a slight amount of extra framerate headroom to compensate a bit.

SingleMaltScot wrote:I don’t play competitively anymore, but I am quite sensitive to motion blur and tearing as I feel it breaks the sense of immersion. Mostly I stick with first person and third person single player these days.

You probably use VSYNC ON with ULMB, I presume -- to make ULMB much smoother. There are some new low-lag VSYNC ON tricks that helps the ULMB situation too.

SingleMaltScot wrote:I narrowed my choices down to the following:
1. One of the newer IPS 27” screens with a minimum 144 hz and 2560x1440 such as the Acer XB271HU or the Asus PG279QZ.
2. Wait for the LG34GK950F to be available in Canada. Currently can’t buy this model without importing, which I’m reluctant to do due to panel lottery. The reason I was interested in this one, as opposed to the other 1440 ultrawides, is that it seems to have an option to run LG’s version of motion blur reduction and reports indicate it plays well with g-sync using the latest drivers.
3. The last choice is sit out for another year or two hoping better options become available.

My biggest concern is that when I move from 1080p to 1440 or even worse 1440 ultrawide that the drop in framerates is going to be very noticeable as I expect it will pull my average framerates below 100 on newer titles. In general I saw a lot of positive comments from people with the upgrade to 1440, however I like being able to play at Ultra settings and not worry too much about low framerates. I’ve looked at the monitors in-store, however they are usually not setup in a way that would provide much of a meaningful evaluation.

Due to the vicious circle effect (explained near the bottom of the famous 1000Hz Journey article), higher resolutions starts to demand higher framerates because of the bigger difference in image clarity between static images (which are sharper due to 1440p) and moving images (higher resolutions do not reduce motion blur).

Throw IPS into this soup, and you might start feeling you want to upgrade to an RTX 2080 SLI to milk the framerates necessary to compensate for the double motion blur penalty that the use of IPS and the use of 1440p does.

Maybe the color quality of IPS, but your post said you are sensitive to motion blur so I wanted to give you heads-up warning that you're facing a double blur penalty from TN->IPS and 1080p->1440p. Is better colors more important, or better blur?

Or you need both?

Lowest blur 1440p I've ever seen
As as compromise, you may want to consider the Lenovo Y27gq which is being released soon. It's the 0.5ms 1440p 240Hz GSYNC monitor. You'd run it in GSYNC mode to have the butter-smoothness and the excellent NVIDIA variable-overdrive that gets enabled during GSYNC mode. I saw this monitor in person at CES 2019 and the panel looked really clean and colorful (certainly better looking than older TN panels) so if you want the lowest-blur 1440p that my human eyes has ever seen, being Blur Busters, now you know what I'm drooling over currently at the moment. That said, I really want to know how good its NVIDIA dynamically variable overdrive behaves at lower framerates, but I was also starting at a fluctuating-framerate game and didn't see 144fps being any worse than a 144fps TN.

Best upcoming high-Hz IPS ultrawide
As for ultrawides that had low motion blur, the best IPS ultrawide in motion clarity at CES 2019 I saw was the LG 38GL950G-G monitor -- a 175Hz IPS 3840x1600 ultrawide with GSYNC. That's quite a huge number of pixels for your RTX 2080 to push though, making you tempted to adjust detail levels to keep framerates high and low-blur.

You're VR ready already! Consider Virtual Reality too as additional tool.
i.e. Buy an Oculus Rift too. In addition to gaming monitor too.
It's like wearing LightBoost/ULMB but with bright OLED colors and WAY more immersive. Zero blur, zero stutter, zero tearing.

-- Also, your computer is way more powerful enough for really immersive VR. You like low blur? You like immersion? You play solo from time to time? Here's a alternative or additional idea in addition to a monitor. Get an Oculus Rift too. , as it's my favourite headsets because its Touch controllers are better than the competition (HTC) and Oculus has already caught up in roomscale experience without crashing into your furniture.
-- New improved Oculus software now makes it safe to use in the middle of a cluttered room (with 4 walls full of furniture clutter) by automatically flashing a grid in front of you if you get too close to edges. Now almost any room can benefit from VR.
-- Zero-blur immersion! OLED brilliant colors better than IPS. Perfect ULMB motion clarity that doesn't look dark.
-- A great game of Lone Echo or Red Matter or Robo Recall can be an amazing experience that gives you zero headaches if you configure the games correctly.
-- It's 100x better than Google Cardboard and 10,000x better than yesteryear gimmicky Dactyl Nightmare or other toy VR in the past.
-- Sure, some of the games are WAY too gimmicky and nauseating, but those 1% of games are.... stunning immersion gems. Not even Cyberpunk 2077 can touch them in immersion. A zen vacation. Some games are relaxing vacations. Others give you a fancy gym's full of exercise (e.g. Beat Saber -- a merger of Rock Hero + lightsabers)
-- You can make do with simply seated-only VR or standing-onlky VR. But why miss out on the new roomscale upgrade? Still works on tiny patches of floor in the middle of a crowded room.
-- My recommendation is you buy three Oculus sensors (don't live with only two) and have at least a 5x7 empty space in the middle of your room (a blue holodeck grid will immediately appear in virtual reality if you get too close to your computer room's furniture, allowing you to safely back into the middle of your room's open space. So you're safe from crashing into walls). And buy a VR carabiner that hangs from the middle of your computer room's ceiling. So freedom to roam around a cluttered computer/office room (since the holodeck grid tells you when you're approaching too close to walls/furniture/etc). Get high-quality active USB3 repeater cables like the CableMatters cables (30 and 45 feet versions exist) to reach rear-mounted sensors. That way you can safely walk around and spin around. Of course, some of the VR games and experiences are sit-down experiences like car-racing games, or if you're too tired to run a game in roomscale mode (BTW, it is great winter exercise, 100x more fun than a gym....VR headset is cheaper than a year's worth of expensive gym membership one sometimes never uses).
-- Perhaps you might not be interested in VR....but consider it as an additional option in your gaming toolbox. You know, Oculus Rifts are falling in price -- $349 for an Oculus kit now! Plus a a bit of extras to get your Roomscale. So, you've got a VR-ready rig, you hate blur, you love immersion, so.....pointing out a new, additional tool of fun for your gaming experiences! I didn't need to modify my cluttered office, I just simply told the software I had a 5x7 empty space in the middle of my room, and I simply let it display a "holodeck wall" (the chaperone feature to prevent you from bumping into walls) in front of my furniture if I start walking too close to the edges of my office, so I didn't really need to make much modifications.
-- If you want to consider VR, get this shopping list: Oculus Rift deluxe kit, 1 extra sensor, 1 unpowered HDMI extension, 1 unpowered USB extension, and 2 active USB extensions, detachable VR carabiner kit to hold cable temporarily above you, furniture/wall mount sensor holders (Click for an entire Amazon Shopping List that gets you everything you need to setup a fully safe Oculus roomscale in the cleared middle-floor-area of a cluttered computer room you're very nervous of crashing into furniture of) -- It even includes the ultralong USB cables that I routed behind my furniture.
-- I've already vetted the above as being compatible with the Oculus Rift and its sensors, as I own all of these (including the precise brands). Even the extension cables make the USB3 ports on my computer function more reliably, since the USB extension cables also include an optional power jack that optionally allows an external power adaptor to power the Oculus sensor if your computer is unable to feed enough USB power.
-- Just make sure you have 4 free USB3 ports (or 3 USB3 + 1 USB2) for your headset and the 3 high bandwidth sensors. If you don't have enough ports, just throw in the Startech 4-port USB3 PCI Express card if you need more USB3 ports in your computer.
-- Don't forget to max-out detail since you have an RTX 2080. You'll easily be able to do 1.6x to 2.0x supersampling in nearly all your VR games, with all game detail maxed out in the current VR games.
-- Now you've got your zero-blur good-OLED-colors zero-tearing personal Holodeck in the middle of your cluttered computer room!

So, yes, I just threw a few extra options on your table. Hopefully it's not all too complicated. ;)
Head of Blur Busters - BlurBusters.com | TestUFO.com | Follow @BlurBusters on Twitter

       To support Blur Busters:
       • Official List of Best Gaming Monitors
       • List of G-SYNC Monitors
       • List of FreeSync Monitors
       • List of Ultrawide Monitors
User avatar
Chief Blur Buster
Site Admin
 
Posts: 6260
Joined: 05 Dec 2013, 15:44

Re: Another "help me choose" thread!

Postby SingleMaltScot » 07 Feb 2019, 18:40

SingleMaltScot wrote:I started thinking about upgrading after seeing a few monitors in store. Specifically the newer IPS screens look significantly better than my older TN (calibrated using a Spyder 3). Also, I’m quite drawn to the ultrawide format as it seems very immersive.

Chief Blur Buster wrote:My experience is some newer TN monitors can have as good colors as IPS with the sole exception of worse viewing angles. So if you're a motion-blur-sensitive person, don't dismiss TN entirely. It depends on the monitor, though. How important is motion blur versus color? Maybe IPS is the right choice for you, but you have to weigh the variables.


This is a great point. I think my honing in on one type of panel is perhaps a mistake. Ideally I would like better colours than my existing monitor, but if I can achieve an improvement with different panel types I need to stay open to that. Viewing angle is of very little importance to me, so a TN with better colour could be a good option.

Chief Blur Buster wrote:If you have a $1K budget, why not the Lenovo Y27gq monitor? The 0.5ms 1440p 240Hz GSYNC monitor.


For the Y27gq, I had seen some posts on that in the last few weeks and unfortunately dismissed them due to my initial fixation on IPS type monitors. I went back and reread some of the initial thoughts on this monitor and it looks very promising. At this point i'm leaning towards holding off a few months until the early reviews for this panel come in before I make a decision.

SingleMaltScot wrote:I currently have an older Acer XB270HA monitor. This is a 27” TN screen with 144 Hz and G-sync. The monitor has ULMB, however I consider it to be unusable, even in a dark room due to the loss in brightness. Dark levels in games become unplayable.

Chief Blur Buster wrote:The ULMB in some newer monitors are approximately 3x brighter. It depends on the monitor though.
However, sheer framerate can be the motion blur reduction method instead; 200fps has half the motion blur of 100fps.

The slower pixel response of IPS means you'll need maybe 120fps-144fps to have roughly the same motion blur of a 100fps TN. They are quite similar, but the slower pixel response does add a slight amount of extra blur as the frametimes start to approach GtG-time (144ffps = 6.9ms frametime = very close to IPS GtG = becomes noticeable motion blur bottleneck). When GtG becomes more than half a refreshtime on a VRR monitor, it can begin to really noticeably bottleneck motion blur. Keep this in mind when purchasing an IPS panel, if you have a motion blur sensitivity. You will want a slight amount of extra framerate headroom to compensate a bit.


SingleMaltScot wrote:I don’t play competitively anymore, but I am quite sensitive to motion blur and tearing as I feel it breaks the sense of immersion. Mostly I stick with first person and third person single player these days.

Chief Blur Buster wrote:You probably use VSYNC ON with ULMB, I presume -- to make ULMB much smoother. There are some new low-lag VSYNC ON tricks that helps the ULMB situation too.

SingleMaltScot wrote:I narrowed my choices down to the following:
1. One of the newer IPS 27” screens with a minimum 144 hz and 2560x1440 such as the Acer XB271HU or the Asus PG279QZ.
2. Wait for the LG34GK950F to be available in Canada. Currently can’t buy this model without importing, which I’m reluctant to do due to panel lottery. The reason I was interested in this one, as opposed to the other 1440 ultrawides, is that it seems to have an option to run LG’s version of motion blur reduction and reports indicate it plays well with g-sync using the latest drivers.
3. The last choice is sit out for another year or two hoping better options become available.

My biggest concern is that when I move from 1080p to 1440 or even worse 1440 ultrawide that the drop in framerates is going to be very noticeable as I expect it will pull my average framerates below 100 on newer titles. In general I saw a lot of positive comments from people with the upgrade to 1440, however I like being able to play at Ultra settings and not worry too much about low framerates. I’ve looked at the monitors in-store, however they are usually not setup in a way that would provide much of a meaningful evaluation.

Chief Blur Buster wrote:Due to the vicious circle effect (explained near the bottom of the famous 1000Hz Journey article), higher resolutions starts to demand higher framerates because of the bigger difference in image clarity between static images (which are sharper due to 1440p) and moving images (higher resolutions do not reduce motion blur).

Throw IPS into this soup, and you might start feeling you want to upgrade to an RTX 2080 SLI to milk the framerates necessary to compensate for the double motion blur penalty that the use of IPS and the use of 1440p does.

Maybe the color quality of IPS, but your post said you are sensitive to motion blur so I wanted to give you heads-up warning that you're facing a double blur penalty from TN->IPS and 1080p->1440p. Is better colors more important, or better blur?

Or you need both?



Lowest blur 1440p I've ever seen
As as compromise, you may want to consider the Lenovo Y27gq which is being released soon. It's the 0.5ms 1440p 240Hz GSYNC monitor. You'd run it in GSYNC mode to have the butter-smoothness and the excellent NVIDIA variable-overdrive that gets enabled during GSYNC mode. I saw this monitor in person at CES 2019 and the panel looked really clean and colorful (certainly better looking than older TN panels) so if you want the lowest-blur 1440p that my human eyes has ever seen, being Blur Busters, now you know what I'm drooling over currently at the moment. That said, I really want to know how good its NVIDIA dynamically variable overdrive behaves at lower framerates, but I was also starting at a fluctuating-framerate game and didn't see 144fps being any worse than a 144fps TN.

Best upcoming high-Hz IPS ultrawide
As for ultrawides that had low motion blur, the best IPS ultrawide in motion clarity at CES 2019 I saw was the LG 38GL950G-G monitor -- a 175Hz IPS 3840x1600 ultrawide with GSYNC. That's quite a huge number of pixels for your RTX 2080 to push though, making you tempted to adjust detail levels to keep framerates high and low-blur.

You're VR ready already! Consider Virtual Reality too as additional tool.
i.e. Buy an Oculus Rift too. In addition to gaming monitor too.
It's like wearing LightBoost/ULMB but with bright OLED colors and WAY more immersive. Zero blur, zero stutter, zero tearing.

-- Also, your computer is way more powerful enough for really immersive VR. You like low blur? You like immersion? You play solo from time to time? Here's a alternative or additional idea in addition to a monitor. Get an Oculus Rift too. , as it's my favourite headsets because its Touch controllers are better than the competition (HTC) and Oculus has already caught up in roomscale experience without crashing into your furniture.
-- New improved Oculus software now makes it safe to use in the middle of a cluttered room (with 4 walls full of furniture clutter) by automatically flashing a grid in front of you if you get too close to edges. Now almost any room can benefit from VR.
-- Zero-blur immersion! OLED brilliant colors better than IPS. Perfect ULMB motion clarity that doesn't look dark.
-- A great game of Lone Echo or Red Matter or Robo Recall can be an amazing experience that gives you zero headaches if you configure the games correctly.
-- It's 100x better than Google Cardboard and 10,000x better than yesteryear gimmicky Dactyl Nightmare or other toy VR in the past.
-- Sure, some of the games are WAY too gimmicky and nauseating, but those 1% of games are.... stunning immersion gems. Not even Cyberpunk 2077 can touch them in immersion. A zen vacation. Some games are relaxing vacations. Others give you a fancy gym's full of exercise (e.g. Beat Saber -- a merger of Rock Hero + lightsabers)
-- You can make do with simply seated-only VR or standing-onlky VR. But why miss out on the new roomscale upgrade? Still works on tiny patches of floor in the middle of a crowded room.
-- My recommendation is you buy three Oculus sensors (don't live with only two) and have at least a 5x7 empty space in the middle of your room (a blue holodeck grid will immediately appear in virtual reality if you get too close to your computer room's furniture, allowing you to safely back into the middle of your room's open space. So you're safe from crashing into walls). And buy a VR carabiner that hangs from the middle of your computer room's ceiling. So freedom to roam around a cluttered computer/office room (since the holodeck grid tells you when you're approaching too close to walls/furniture/etc). Get high-quality active USB3 repeater cables like the CableMatters cables (30 and 45 feet versions exist) to reach rear-mounted sensors. That way you can safely walk around and spin around. Of course, some of the VR games and experiences are sit-down experiences like car-racing games, or if you're too tired to run a game in roomscale mode (BTW, it is great winter exercise, 100x more fun than a gym....VR headset is cheaper than a year's worth of expensive gym membership one sometimes never uses).
-- Perhaps you might not be interested in VR....but consider it as an additional option in your gaming toolbox. You know, Oculus Rifts are falling in price -- $349 for an Oculus kit now! Plus a a bit of extras to get your Roomscale. So, you've got a VR-ready rig, you hate blur, you love immersion, so.....pointing out a new, additional tool of fun for your gaming experiences! I didn't need to modify my cluttered office, I just simply told the software I had a 5x7 empty space in the middle of my room, and I simply let it display a "holodeck wall" (the chaperone feature to prevent you from bumping into walls) in front of my furniture if I start walking too close to the edges of my office, so I didn't really need to make much modifications.
-- If you want to consider VR, get this shopping list: Oculus Rift deluxe kit, 1 extra sensor, 1 unpowered HDMI extension, 1 unpowered USB extension, and 2 active USB extensions, detachable VR carabiner kit to hold cable temporarily above you, furniture/wall mount sensor holders (Click for an entire Amazon Shopping List that gets you everything you need to setup a fully safe Oculus roomscale in the cleared middle-floor-area of a cluttered computer room you're very nervous of crashing into furniture of) -- It even includes the ultralong USB cables that I routed behind my furniture.
-- I've already vetted the above as being compatible with the Oculus Rift and its sensors, as I own all of these (including the precise brands). Even the extension cables make the USB3 ports on my computer function more reliably, since the USB extension cables also include an optional power jack that optionally allows an external power adaptor to power the Oculus sensor if your computer is unable to feed enough USB power.
-- Just make sure you have 4 free USB3 ports (or 3 USB3 + 1 USB2) for your headset and the 3 high bandwidth sensors. If you don't have enough ports, just throw in the Startech 4-port USB3 PCI Express card if you need more USB3 ports in your computer.
-- Don't forget to max-out detail since you have an RTX 2080. You'll easily be able to do 1.6x to 2.0x supersampling in nearly all your VR games, with all game detail maxed out in the current VR games.
-- Now you've got your zero-blur good-OLED-colors zero-tearing personal Holodeck in the middle of your cluttered computer room!

So, yes, I just threw a few extra options on your table. Hopefully it's not all too complicated. ;)


Wow, this is a lot do digest! I really appreciate the long and detailed response as it's given me a lot to mull over. The problem when you start down this path is that there are so many options, so many reviews, and so many settings to get to a really good place. As a layperson who doesn't look at this every day it's hard to keep even the limited information I have read front and center in my brain to weigh the pluses and minuses of each solution. With the prices of these high end monitors being so high I think it's worth it for anyone to do some serious research before buying.

Overall I'm really intrigued by the Lenovo Y27gq. It looks like this may be a good path forward with excellent blur reduction potential, improved colours over my older TN, and a resolution that I should be able to drive and maintain very good frame rates. At the end of the day I would choose blur reduction over improved colour as the improved colour is something I primarily notice when comparing monitors, however blur in practically any form is something that I notice constantly when playing games. As for ultrawide, I think I'm putting that on the back burner due to the potential impact on frame rates that I'm just not willing to live with.

As for VR, that is a rabbit hole I'll need to dive into. I'm going to start looking into this as that could be a real game changer for immersive gaming. I hadn't really thought about this in quite some time, however the costs are starting to look very reasonable. I think I'm going to be very tempted to give this a try while I'm waiting for the next couple of months to make my primary monitor decision.

I really appreciate the input as it's already helping me frame this challenging purchase in a better way.

I'll be sure to update with my choice and thoughts once I've decided to pull the trigger. Hopefully the Lenovo reviews start to show up in March or April as I'd like to make a decision in the next few months.
SingleMaltScot
 
Posts: 2
Joined: 06 Feb 2019, 14:29

Re: Another "help me choose" thread!

Postby Chief Blur Buster » 07 Feb 2019, 19:13

We're full of rabbit holes! ;)

Now, one last note about virtual reality
In two decades, VR will probably be a lot easier and simpler once we can just simply buy lightweight AppleOakley or MicrosoftOakley VR sunglasses without a lot of cables and sensors. Less fuss and muss, probably. But right now, at under 350 bucks for a mostly complete Oculus Rift kit, plus a few extras, it's a relatively tiny cost-increase to an unquestionably VR ready computer.

And those roomscale improvements in the last 2 years has made Oculus Rift safe for a cluttered office room. if you can at least clear a patch in the middle of your room. The now slightly-lighter headsets weight is no longer problem if you suspend the cable above you with a VR carabiner kit (and add some padding foam if need be). It's the first time the "Holodeck feel" actually began - wright brothers style - began to feel real.

To even help you sort through the crud of crappy VR microgames, or barfbag experiences, that makes many people throw up arms about VR, here's a few 4-star-rated or 4.5-star-rated Holodeck-worthy science fiction games that doesn't give you VR headaches. "Robo Recall" (free), "Red Matter" (cheap), "Lone Echo" (full price). But just those three example titles alone, if no further VR games are ever released for virtual reality, is actually worth the cost of a $349 Rift kit! Even in the still-sparse world of proper award-winning VR content, there's other great high-rated curated stuff like sitting in an Apollo 11 moon launch to sitting passively inside a Pixar-style movie (literally, 100x better than Real3D glasses at cinema, and less eyestrain than any cinema 3D glasses).

Today's VR kit prices gives you more hours of fun (cheaper than the cost of airfare or gym membership) that takes you exploring other worlds in your personal Holodeck.

P.S. This is already published throughout, but fair disclosure of the Amazon links (such as the Blur Busters VR shopping list): They support the operation of Blur Busters! If you think that Blur Busters was the most helpful in your buying decisions, and saved you hours of research, use our links! Thanks for supporting Blur Busters if you do (optionally) decide to use the Blur Busters Amazon links to purchase your kit. Cheers!
Head of Blur Busters - BlurBusters.com | TestUFO.com | Follow @BlurBusters on Twitter

       To support Blur Busters:
       • Official List of Best Gaming Monitors
       • List of G-SYNC Monitors
       • List of FreeSync Monitors
       • List of Ultrawide Monitors
User avatar
Chief Blur Buster
Site Admin
 
Posts: 6260
Joined: 05 Dec 2013, 15:44


Return to General — Displays, Graphics & More

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 11 guests