[Temperature Sensitivity] Weird response time behaviour on my hp omen x25f

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Raven
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Joined: 02 May 2021, 15:56

[Temperature Sensitivity] Weird response time behaviour on my hp omen x25f

Post by Raven » 02 May 2021, 16:01

Hello,

I bought an hp omen x25f a week ago. And I have very weird things happening. At first the response time looked great but after some time, it got worse (I have it on fastest overdrive).
Now, I noticed something very weird : when I change the gamma setting to an other value, the response time gets immediately significantly better but it lasts few minutes and then it slows down again. And If I change the gamma again, the response time speeds up again for few minutes before slowing down. It's extremely unnerving as when the response time is slow, my games are not playable in a competitive way.

I don't understand this behaviour. And I can't find a way to make my response times stay as fast as the few minutes after I changed the gamma setting to whatever value. Do any of you understand this ? Did I receive a defective unit ?

Thanks in advance,

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Chief Blur Buster
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Re: Weird response time behaviour on my hp omen x25 f

Post by Chief Blur Buster » 02 May 2021, 21:50

LCD GtG can be very temperature sensitive

If you are sensitive to temperature-changes to LCD GtG pixel response, try disabling the monitor's sleep mode and make sure it's running hot for a while before beginning to adjust/play it.

Some tips to keep LCD pixel response stable during gameplay:
  1. Warm up monitor for 30 minutes before adjusting/playing.
    This is the most important tip. During winter in cold rooms, you may need to warm up 60-120 minutes. So, hands off that picture settings menu until the monitor's been already on for 30 minutes minimum!...
  2. If you intermittently use the computer throughout day, keep LCD on all day.
    This prevent the warmup/cooldown response changes. Use a very long sleep timer such as 2 or 4 hours.
  3. Keep the temperature of the LCD stable by keeping your room's temperature stable.
    Don't let heaters/air conditioners blow directly at screen surface. (Desk fans are OK)
  4. Adjust monitor angle to its ideal natural angle and adjust gamma based on it. Stick to that viewing angle
    Afterwards, don't change viewing angle. Some TN LCDs look best / look most stable when your eyes are viewing screen-center head-on, while other TN LCDs look best when your eyes are viewing perpendicular to the screen's top edge (i.e. lower screen on its stand until screen top edge is eye level). Test both angles to see what your TN LCD looks/behaves best at, and then stick to that angle. Use screen tilt if you can't lower/raise. Panel tuning will affect what viewing angle GtG and GtG response looks most stable at -- pixel response looks different from low angles or high angles, especially on TN LCDs.
If it's new and has not been played for more than a few hours, give it a 72 hour full power burn-in (video loop or full screen animated graphics while away from PC, maximum brightness, no screen saver, no shutdown, no sleep) to properly redistribute the liquid layer of the LCD. GtG pixel response usually stabilizes (for a specific room temperature) after that.

RTINGS and HardwareUnboxed does burn-in before testing -- they run the monitor powered for a long time to let them settle first.
You should too, if you are this sensitive to visible pixel response changes.

VA LCDs are most temperature sensitive than TN and IPS LCDs. TN and IPS are very similar, but due to TN viewing angles, the IPS insensitivity to viewing angles can make IPS seem the least temperature-sensitive panel technology versus TN and VA, despite IPS and TN being very similar when viewed at its ideal angle.

The HP OMEN X25F is a TN LCD. TN has known viewing angle issues, so at different angles can amplify temperature sensitivity to its pixel response. Some TN LCDs are better than others. The stronger the viewing angle issue (worse TN versus better TN), the more temperature sensitive the TN LCD is since the viewing angle is an amplifier for pixel response speed changes (changes to appearance of ghosting while monitor warms up).

Also, your sensitivity to pixel response changes may, make you a good candidate for one of those new post-2020-era "1ms Fast IPS" esports gaming screens. The best 240 Hz IPS now have similar response time nowadays as the HP OMEN X25f now (an average TN response time wise).

There will always be some LCD GtG drift when warming up a cold LCD in winter to full warm temperature during gameplay. Just like a forgotten LCD in a cold car (e.g. forgotten smartphone in car in freezing weather), LCD screens respond much slower when cold. Even a 2 degree temperature difference makes human-visible ghosting differences.

If the tips above still does not help you, try testing a different monitor for reduced temperature sensitivity such as IPS for reduced temperature-derived drifts to LCD pixel response. If your monitor built-in power supply is inefficient (generates lots of heat), making the screen almost too hot to touch -- the temperature differential along the screen surface can mean faster GtG (at bottom edge) and slower GtG (at top edge) if the local hot spot is at bottom edge of screen. Built-in monitor power supplies need to be very efficient to prevent generating extremely hot temperatures that creates excess LCD GtG pixel response drifting from temperature changes.
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1000WATT
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Joined: 22 Jul 2018, 05:44

Re: Weird response time behaviour on my hp omen x25 f

Post by 1000WATT » 02 May 2021, 23:12

I often do not clearly state my thoughts. google translate is far from perfect. And in addition to the translator, I myself am mistaken. Do not take me seriously.

Raven
Posts: 3
Joined: 02 May 2021, 15:56

Re: Weird response time behaviour on my hp omen x25 f

Post by Raven » 03 May 2021, 02:18

Chief Blur Buster wrote:
02 May 2021, 21:50
LCD GtG can be very temperature sensitive

If you are sensitive to temperature-changes to LCD GtG pixel response, try disabling the monitor's sleep mode and make sure it's running hot for a while before beginning to adjust/play it.

Some tips to keep LCD pixel response stable during gameplay:
  1. Warm up monitor for 30 minutes before adjusting/playing.
    This is the most important tip. During winter in cold rooms, you may need to warm up 60-120 minutes. So, hands off that picture settings menu until the monitor's been already on for 30 minutes minimum!...
  2. If you intermittently use the computer throughout day, keep LCD on all day.
    This prevent the warmup/cooldown response changes. Use a very long sleep timer such as 2 or 4 hours.
  3. Keep the temperature of the LCD stable by keeping your room's temperature stable.
    Don't let heaters/air conditioners blow directly at screen surface. (Desk fans are OK)
  4. Adjust monitor angle to its ideal natural angle and adjust gamma based on it. Stick to that viewing angle
    Afterwards, don't change viewing angle. Some TN LCDs look best / look most stable when your eyes are viewing screen-center head-on, while other TN LCDs look best when your eyes are viewing perpendicular to the screen's top edge (i.e. lower screen on its stand until screen top edge is eye level). Test both angles to see what your TN LCD looks/behaves best at, and then stick to that angle. Use screen tilt if you can't lower/raise. Panel tuning will affect what viewing angle GtG and GtG response looks most stable at -- pixel response looks different from low angles or high angles, especially on TN LCDs.
If it's new and has not been played for more than a few hours, give it a 72 hour full power burn-in (video loop or full screen animated graphics while away from PC, maximum brightness, no screen saver, no shutdown, no sleep) to properly redistribute the liquid layer of the LCD. GtG pixel response usually stabilizes (for a specific room temperature) after that.

RTINGS and HardwareUnboxed does burn-in before testing -- they run the monitor powered for a long time to let them settle first.
You should too, if you are this sensitive to visible pixel response changes.

VA LCDs are most temperature sensitive than TN and IPS LCDs. TN and IPS are very similar, but due to TN viewing angles, the IPS insensitivity to viewing angles can make IPS seem the least temperature-sensitive panel technology versus TN and VA, despite IPS and TN being very similar when viewed at its ideal angle.

The HP OMEN X25F is a TN LCD. TN has known viewing angle issues, so at different angles can amplify temperature sensitivity to its pixel response. Some TN LCDs are better than others. The stronger the viewing angle issue (worse TN versus better TN), the more temperature sensitive the TN LCD is since the viewing angle is an amplifier for pixel response speed changes (changes to appearance of ghosting while monitor warms up).

Also, your sensitivity to pixel response changes may, make you a good candidate for one of those new post-2020-era "1ms Fast IPS" esports gaming screens. The best 240 Hz IPS now have similar response time nowadays as the HP OMEN X25f now (an average TN response time wise).

There will always be some LCD GtG drift when warming up a cold LCD in winter to full warm temperature during gameplay. Just like a forgotten LCD in a cold car (e.g. forgotten smartphone in car in freezing weather), LCD screens respond much slower when cold. Even a 2 degree temperature difference makes human-visible ghosting differences.

If the tips above still does not help you, try testing a different monitor for reduced temperature sensitivity such as IPS for reduced temperature-derived drifts to LCD pixel response. If your monitor built-in power supply is inefficient (generates lots of heat), making the screen almost too hot to touch -- the temperature differential along the screen surface can mean faster GtG (at bottom edge) and slower GtG (at top edge) if the local hot spot is at bottom edge of screen. Built-in monitor power supplies need to be very efficient to prevent generating extremely hot temperatures that creates excess LCD GtG pixel response drifting from temperature changes.
Thank you very much chief. This is very interesting and informative. I will try all those tips and see how it goes.

Raven
Posts: 3
Joined: 02 May 2021, 15:56

[Temperature Sensitivity] Weird response time behaviour on my hp omen x25f

Post by Raven » 03 May 2021, 02:23

Thanks, I’ll see if reducing contrast has an impact on percieved response time.

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