Function request

Discussion about 120fps HFR as well as future Ultra HFR (240fps, 480fps and 1000fps) playing back in real time on high refresh rate displays. See Ultra HFR HOWTO for bleeding edge experimentation.
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Demonslasher86
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Joined: 16 Sep 2021, 08:39

Function request

Post by Demonslasher86 » 16 Sep 2021, 08:51

Hi, I don't know if this is te correct section but, would it be possible to have a frame where you put in two colours and have them shown one after another at different framerates?
I'm asking this because I found that some people on my 144hz monitor see red and blue totally blended in a fucsia while I see a bit of shimmer even at 240hz, having a frame like that here on blurbusters could give people the possibility to find their "interpolation speed limit", doesn't it?

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Chief Blur Buster
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Re: Function request

Post by Chief Blur Buster » 16 Sep 2021, 12:53

Demonslasher86 wrote:
16 Sep 2021, 08:51
Hi, I don't know if this is te correct section but, would it be possible to have a frame where you put in two colours and have them shown one after another at different framerates?
What's the special use case for this? I have a color sequential demo TestUFO at www.testufo.com/rainboweffect which allows an LCD to simulate a DLP color wheel surprisingly accurately on a 240Hz or 360Hz monitor.
Demonslasher86 wrote:
16 Sep 2021, 08:51
I'm asking this because I found that some people on my 144hz monitor see red and blue totally blended in a fucsia while I see a bit of shimmer even at 240hz, having a frame like that here on blurbusters could give people the possibility to find their "interpolation speed limit", doesn't it?
You must be using a NanoIPS panel with KSF-phosphor panel in a motion blur reduction strobed mode. The slow red phosphor can create the red/cyan fringing during strobed motion on a KSF panel. That cannot be synchronized reliably with video, as the phosphor fades at sub-refresh intervals.

You are right that different humans have different flicker fusion thresholds. Some see it at lower Hz and others at higher Hz.

Flicker fusion thresholds are indeed much lower than motion-blur thresholds and stroboscopic thresholds as seen in www.blurbusters.com/area51

Most humans have flicker fusion thresholds in the two-digit Hz range (typically very approximately ~70Hz, but can be lower or higher), although stroboscopic effect of finite frame rates can be detected at triple and quadruple digit refresh rates, during certain situations (moving eyes around on stationary objects, or staring stationary while moving objects scroll past) -- the mousearrow effect.
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