Optimal settings

Ask about motion blur reduction in gaming monitors. Includes ULMB (Ultra Low Motion Blur), NVIDIA LightBoost, ASUS ELMB, BenQ/Zowie DyAc, Turbo240, ToastyX Strobelight, etc.
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insight2
Posts: 5
Joined: 13 Mar 2020, 11:22

Optimal settings

Post by insight2 » 13 Mar 2020, 11:26

First off all, thanks for all the content you share, i found myself reading articles in this website several times.
I've got two questions, any help is appreciated:

1: for csgo, is it better to use in game v-sync or NVCP v-sync?
2: is the input lag difference between 237 fps and uncapped relevant?

I play csgo with an i9 9900k and a 2080 which is pretty overkill,
but still I am running the game @ 237 fps cap, with in-game vsync on cause I hate tearing. (i've got a pg258q asus monitor)
Most of the game engines start having issues at extreme high framerates so that worries me as well. Also going too high on framerate would put my system under load which could lead to some input lag as well.
I am trying to find the perfect balance between image quality and low latency. The fact i could get 300-400 fps easily makes me wonder if I should uncap the framerate. Thanks in advance.

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Chief Blur Buster
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Re: Optimal settings

Post by Chief Blur Buster » 13 Mar 2020, 19:35

insight2 wrote:
13 Mar 2020, 11:26
1: for csgo, is it better to use in game v-sync or NVCP v-sync?
Use either these 2 approaches

(A) Enable G-SYNC and use 237fps cap.
Pros: Ultra-silk motion, no tearing, no stutter, behaves like a "237Hz lagless VSYNC ON"

(B) Or disable G-SYNC and use VSYNC OFF and use either 300fps or 500fps cap.
Pros: A very, very, very tiny amount less lag, but has more microstutter / tearing that might affect aiming.

(A) vs (B) is a user preference. Usually (A) can give noticeably better scores in poorly optimized games like PUBG that stutters so much that the stutters wreck your aiming (and G-SYNC improves your aiming in 240Hz PUBG). While it matters less for CS:GO and most esports use (B) because CS:GO just wants to blast framerate out of wazoo far beyond Hz.

There's an option (C) for users who don't have G-SYNC, but hate VSYNC OFF, there's also the RTSS Scanline Sync option. Also good if you prefer ULMB which prefers perfect fps=Hz motion to be worth it. But if you don't use strobing on your PG258Q, then option (C) is moot to you for CS:GO and similar games.
insight2 wrote:
13 Mar 2020, 11:26
2: is the input lag difference between 237 fps and uncapped relevant?

3fps differentials is only for G-SYNC and FreeSync. Please tell that to whomever told you about 3fps, if they parrotted that advice without mentioning that it's the cap applicable to VRR displays. Don't use 3fps unless you understand when to use 3fps correctly.
Understand The Capping Differential (fps vs Hz)!

For your situation, if you use G-SYNC, use the in-game frame rate cap. The CS:GO built-in capping feature is lower lag than external frame rate cap. As for whether to use "G-SYNC + VSYNC ON" or "G-SYNC + VSYNC OFF", that should theoretically not matter until the frame rate matches or exceeds refresh rate.

But in reality, the instantaneous frame rate can be erratic (e.g. some frames 1/235sec, some frames 1/245sec, etc). You can also use a bigger differential, such as 5fps below (235fps) to give you more safety margin for erratic frametimes that becomes faster than the refresh cycle (where lag or tearing matters).

A perfect 237fps G-SYNC never ever does a VSYNC ON nor a VSYNC OFF, because any frametimes less than refreshtimes, never hits a different sync tech! It's only the capping imperfections, why a 3fps differential exists and is a common parrot recommendation (a good one, provided you enable VRR).
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insight2
Posts: 5
Joined: 13 Mar 2020, 11:22

Re: Optimal settings

Post by insight2 » 14 Mar 2020, 06:15

Chief Blur Buster wrote:
13 Mar 2020, 19:35
insight2 wrote:
13 Mar 2020, 11:26
1: for csgo, is it better to use in game v-sync or NVCP v-sync?
Use either these 2 approaches

(A) Enable G-SYNC and use 237fps cap.
Pros: Ultra-silk motion, no tearing, no stutter, behaves like a "237Hz lagless VSYNC ON"

(B) Or disable G-SYNC and use VSYNC OFF and use either 300fps or 500fps cap.
Pros: A very, very, very tiny amount less lag, but has more microstutter / tearing that might affect aiming.

(A) vs (B) is a user preference. Usually (A) can give noticeably better scores in poorly optimized games like PUBG that stutters so much that the stutters wreck your aiming (and G-SYNC improves your aiming in 240Hz PUBG). While it matters less for CS:GO and most esports use (B) because CS:GO just wants to blast framerate out of wazoo far beyond Hz.

There's an option (C) for users who don't have G-SYNC, but hate VSYNC OFF, there's also the RTSS Scanline Sync option. Also good if you prefer ULMB which prefers perfect fps=Hz motion to be worth it. But if you don't use strobing on your PG258Q, then option (C) is moot to you for CS:GO and similar games.
insight2 wrote:
13 Mar 2020, 11:26
2: is the input lag difference between 237 fps and uncapped relevant?

3fps differentials is only for G-SYNC and FreeSync. Please tell that to whomever told you about 3fps, if they parrotted that advice without mentioning that it's the cap applicable to VRR displays. Don't use 3fps unless you understand when to use 3fps correctly.
Understand The Capping Differential (fps vs Hz)!

For your situation, if you use G-SYNC, use the in-game frame rate cap. The CS:GO built-in capping feature is lower lag than external frame rate cap. As for whether to use "G-SYNC + VSYNC ON" or "G-SYNC + VSYNC OFF", that should theoretically not matter until the frame rate matches or exceeds refresh rate.

But in reality, the instantaneous frame rate can be erratic (e.g. some frames 1/235sec, some frames 1/245sec, etc). You can also use a bigger differential, such as 5fps below (235fps) to give you more safety margin for erratic frametimes that becomes faster than the refresh cycle (where lag or tearing matters).

A perfect 237fps G-SYNC never ever does a VSYNC ON nor a VSYNC OFF, because any frametimes less than refreshtimes, never hits a different sync tech! It's only the capping imperfections, why a 3fps differential exists and is a common parrot recommendation (a good one, provided you enable VRR).
Thanks for the detailed answer Chief, that's all I needed to know, everything is clear now.
I don't notice a big difference in responsiveness between 235 fps (vsync+gsync) and uncapped fps (without vsync obviously)
CSGO fps limiter has fluctuating framerate, that's why I wasn't sure if I had to use it or an external one,
about the vsync I enabled double buffering VSYNC, the game feels really good. I don't notice any difference in delay if I cap the framerato to 500 and disable vsync, so i'll stick to the 235 fps cap, feels really smooth!
Again, thanks for the help.

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