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How do I eliminate frametime spikes from FPS drops (Gsync)

Talk about NVIDIA G-SYNC, a variable refresh rate (VRR) technology. G-SYNC eliminates stutters, tearing, and reduces input lag. List of G-SYNC Monitors.

Re: How do I eliminate frametime spikes from FPS drops (Gsyn

Postby Chief Blur Buster » 10 Dec 2018, 23:45

Modin wrote:Doesn't 90 fps look stuttery after you get used to looking at a game at 141 fps for a while ? I keep hearing people say that you can't go back to 60 after having experienced 120+.

By the way, and this may be too far off-topic, but doesn't Skyrim have broken physics above 60 fps ?


<Context Rescue>

Stuttering in RealNC's context refers to the erratic stutter. Sometimes called "judder" in home theater forums like AVSFORUMS. VRR displays fixes the visibility of this. Random framerates now stay in sync with random refresh rates, every refresh cycle, so it's perfectly smooth like http://www.testufo.com/vrr#framerate=slowrandom ... fluctuating framerates becomes nearly invisible!

Stuttering in Modin's context refers to the low-framerate regular stutter that you easily see in the bottom UFOs at http://www.testufo.com#count=6 .... VRR displays can't fix low-framerate regular stutter (e.g. 30fps), moving objects still look like they're vibrating. VRR can still erase the framerate-change stutter, there's no erratic/spontaneous stutter transition between 30fps->31fps with VRR (like you will see without VRR)

</Context Rescue>

Detection of edge vibration (regular stutter) roughly corresponds to an individual flicker-fusion threshold. On a fast 1ms TN 240Hz display, I can see edge-vibration at ~80Hz-100Hz if I look hard. More easily than 30fps edge-vibration on an old 33ms LCD. Response time will slightly fudge-around how easily edge-vibration is detected. It's like a guitar string. Low frequencies vibrate visibly, while high frequencies simply blends into a blur. That's why 30fps VRR still looks regular-stuttery while 200fps VRR looks smooth. For a visual animation of this on non-VRR displays, see http://www.testufo.com/vrr .... Motion on different displays will stop edge-vibrating above a specific framerate depending on display (response) and human flicker-detection threshold. As a rule of thumb, the ability to detect edge-vibration in moving objects of perfectly smooth "X fps" Sometimes regular stutter is not even called "stutter", but it's easy to get confused buy this terminology/context -- is somewhere in the muddy zone of about 40Hz-100Hz+, display-dependant and human-dependant. More excellent reading on "regular-stutters (of low Hz) are caused by the same thing as sample-hold motion blur (of high Hz)" (the guitar string explanation) can be found in the Blur Busters Law And The Amazing Journey To Future 1000Hz Displays. It's a trait more easily understood when watching a framerate-ramping animation on a VRR display.
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Re: How do I eliminate frametime spikes from FPS drops (Gsyn

Postby RealNC » 11 Dec 2018, 01:46

Modin wrote:I see. Pc gaming is a rabbit hole isn't it ? There's always something to upgrade, always a higher framerate to chase after.

Perhaps. But it becomes second nature after a while though. Like dialing in the air conditioner to the exact value that feels the most comfortable :mrgreen:

Doesn't 90 fps look stuttery after you get used to looking at a game at 141 fps for a while ? I keep hearing people say that you can't go back to 60 after having experienced 120+.

90FPS is the "magic number" for me. It is not stuttery. But the difference is that it has more motion blur than 120 or 144. But it is not stuttery at all to me. If I can play a game at 90FPS g-sync, I actually am perfectly happy. Anything higher is just the cherry on top if I can get it :)

Switching from 90FPS to 60FPS is an extremely jarring change. The stuttery nature of 60FPS is immediately obvious. You can still get used to it again after 15 minutes or so. If you then go back to 90FPS after that, it again feels like a veil has been lifted from your eyes.

By the way, and this may be too far off-topic, but doesn't Skyrim have broken physics above 60 fps ?

It does. But Special Edition has a tweak you can add to Skyrim.ini where you can configure the physics to target a custom frame rate. For 90FPS, I use:

Code: Select all
[HAVOK]
fMaxTime=0.0111023


This can be tested by jumping on one of those carts that usually have cabbages in them. Normally, if you don't use the tweak, you get very high damage while trying to walk on the cart. It also happens when you walk on bones. At 90FPS, you can die in like 2 seconds. With this tweak, you either take no damage, or take the same damage as with 60FPS, because the physics are slowed down just right to match the higher FPS.

See: https://www.reddit.com/r/pcmasterrace/c ... or_skyrim/

Because of OCD, I spent like an hour trying to get the number that gives the most accurate result (which for me is 0.0111023) doing the cabbage cart test :P
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