Overclocking of Qnix Q2710 has no visible effects

Talk about overclocking displays at a higher refresh rate. This includes homebrew, 165Hz, QNIX, Catleap, Overlord Tempest, SEIKI displays, certain HDTVs, and other overclockable displays.
napalmglop
Posts: 12
Joined: 21 Feb 2014, 09:19

Overclocking of Qnix Q2710 has no visible effects

Post by napalmglop » 21 Feb 2014, 09:39

Hi guys,

I've spent time looking for someone in the same situation as me but with no luck.
First a summary of my configuration :
Intel i7 3770K
EVGA GeForce GTX770 4GB Edition
16GB of RAM
Qnix Q2710 and ASUS VE278H

I followed instructions to successfully overclock the Q2710 to 120Hz.
I used different methods like patching the monitor's and then using the NVidia panel, use the EVGA console...

Now the problem is that even though 120Hz is actually selected I see absolutely NO difference between 60 and 120Hz, whether moving the mouse cursor or windows or when playing games like World of Tanks.

Does any one have the same problem?

User avatar
Chief Blur Buster
Site Admin
Posts: 8142
Joined: 05 Dec 2013, 15:44
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Contact:

Re: Overclocking of Qnix Q2710 has no visible effects

Post by Chief Blur Buster » 21 Feb 2014, 10:56

napalmglop wrote:Now the problem is that even though 120Hz is actually selected I see absolutely NO difference between 60 and 120Hz, whether moving the mouse cursor or windows or when playing games like World of Tanks.
The QNIX mostly maxes out motion clarity at approximately 96Hz, due to its slower LCD pixel response, but the average person should still be able to see a difference. So let's go through a few common factors:

1. When playing at 120Hz, you need to run at framerate == refreshrate to get the most out of 120Hz. So find a game that runs at 120fps@120Hz.
2. Use 1000Hz mouse. It's increasingly more important with 120Hz monitors than 60Hz.
3. If you are using Windows 8.1, make sure you use the systemwide Windows 8.1 mouse fix ... This will make mouse and window drag differences visible.
4. Run a motion test at http://www.testufo.com at 120Hz. Does the animation run at 120Hz? Do you see a difference between the 60Hz and 120Hz moving objects? On the QNIX, there should be approximately ~40% less motion blur with the 120fps moving object than the 60fps moving object. (Make sure you're using a stutter-free web browser)
Head of Blur Busters - BlurBusters.com | TestUFO.com | Follow @BlurBusters on Twitter

       To support Blur Busters:
       • Official List of Best Gaming Monitors
       • List of G-SYNC Monitors
       • List of FreeSync Monitors
       • List of Ultrawide Monitors

napalmglop
Posts: 12
Joined: 21 Feb 2014, 09:19

Re: Overclocking of Qnix Q2710 has no visible effects

Post by napalmglop » 21 Feb 2014, 11:46

Thanks for the fast and very detailed reply.
I will run some tests tonight and post the results with the answer to your questions.

napalmglop
Posts: 12
Joined: 21 Feb 2014, 09:19

Re: Overclocking of Qnix Q2710 has no visible effects

Post by napalmglop » 21 Feb 2014, 18:32

I inserted the answers to your comments and questions

1. When playing at 120Hz, you need to run at framerate == refreshrate to get the most out of 120Hz. So find a game that runs at 120fps@120Hz.
I lower the settings to run at a (almost) constant 120fps and I don't see a difference

2. Use 1000Hz mouse. It's increasingly more important with 120Hz monitors than 60Hz.
I have a Razer DeathAdder set at 1800Hz

3. If you are using Windows 8.1, make sure you use the systemwide Windows 8.1 mouse fix ... This will make mouse and window drag differences visible.
I run Windows 7 Ultimate 64bits

4. Run a motion test at http://www.testufo.com at 120Hz. Does the animation run at 120Hz? Do you see a difference between the 60Hz and 120Hz moving objects? On the QNIX, there should be approximately ~40% less motion blur with the 120fps moving object than the 60fps moving object. (Make sure you're using a stutter-free web browser)

With Chrome (nothing else running) the animation runs at 120Hz and I do see the difference with 60Hz but I get sync failure or stutter messages. Unless those messages are caused by some incorrect settings I guess I'm just to picky....

Thanks again for your help.

Haste
Posts: 305
Joined: 22 Dec 2013, 09:03

Re: Overclocking of Qnix Q2710 has no visible effects

Post by Haste » 21 Feb 2014, 18:59

napalmglop wrote: I have a Razer DeathAdder set at 1800Hz
How did you manage to get such a high polling rate?
Monitor: Asus ROG Swift PG279Q

User avatar
shadman
Posts: 95
Joined: 19 Dec 2013, 16:39
Location: West Coast

Re: Overclocking of Qnix Q2710 has no visible effects

Post by shadman » 21 Feb 2014, 20:08

I think he means DPI, but the Deathadder has a 1000Hz polling rate already anyways.

On topic, it might be hard to see a difference with a Qnix. The IPS panel has a slower response, like Chief was saying, so he effects will be less pronounced than a TN from 60Hz to 120Hz. Though you say you haven't seen much difference, you just might not consciously see it or be as sensitive to it. Maybe try using it at 120Hz for awhile, then try 60Hz again and see if there is a difference there.

napalmglop
Posts: 12
Joined: 21 Feb 2014, 09:19

Re: Overclocking of Qnix Q2710 has no visible effects

Post by napalmglop » 21 Feb 2014, 20:28

Haste wrote:
napalmglop wrote: I have a Razer DeathAdder set at 1800Hz
How did you manage to get such a high polling rate?
My bad, I mixed refresh rate (actually 500Hz) and sensitivity (1800dpi).

napalmglop
Posts: 12
Joined: 21 Feb 2014, 09:19

Re: Overclocking of Qnix Q2710 has no visible effects

Post by napalmglop » 21 Feb 2014, 20:31

shadman wrote:I think he means DPI, but the Deathadder has a 1000Hz polling rate already anyways.

On topic, it might be hard to see a difference with a Qnix. The IPS panel has a slower response, like Chief was saying, so he effects will be less pronounced than a TN from 60Hz to 120Hz. Though you say you haven't seen much difference, you just might not consciously see it or be as sensitive to it. Maybe try using it at 120Hz for awhile, then try 60Hz again and see if there is a difference there.
Your answer makes total sense: I think I was expecting way too much. Still I'm very happy with my new monitor, plus I have zero BLB which is cool.

User avatar
Chief Blur Buster
Site Admin
Posts: 8142
Joined: 05 Dec 2013, 15:44
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Contact:

Re: Overclocking of Qnix Q2710 has no visible effects

Post by Chief Blur Buster » 22 Feb 2014, 00:17

napalmglop wrote:My bad, I mixed refresh rate (actually 500Hz) and sensitivity (1800dpi).
Use 1000Hz. Although 500Hz-vs-1000Hz made little difference at 60Hz, it's quite noticeable with LightBoost 120Hz and with GSYNC, so Blur Busters highly recommends 1000Hz as strobing massively amplifies microstutter visibility.
Head of Blur Busters - BlurBusters.com | TestUFO.com | Follow @BlurBusters on Twitter

       To support Blur Busters:
       • Official List of Best Gaming Monitors
       • List of G-SYNC Monitors
       • List of FreeSync Monitors
       • List of Ultrawide Monitors

User avatar
Chief Blur Buster
Site Admin
Posts: 8142
Joined: 05 Dec 2013, 15:44
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Contact:

Re: Overclocking of Qnix Q2710 has no visible effects

Post by Chief Blur Buster » 22 Feb 2014, 00:19

napalmglop wrote:Your answer makes total sense: I think I was expecting way too much. Still I'm very happy with my new monitor, plus I have zero BLB which is cool.
Excellent! Yes, this is correct -- the 120Hz improvement is far less with QNIX than with a strobe-backlight monitor, as I've already written in Blur Busters' Overclocked 1440p 120Hz Guide.

That said, if color and resolution is your priority, the QNIX is a really good choice.

I presume you still see a difference with http://www.testufo.com ?
Head of Blur Busters - BlurBusters.com | TestUFO.com | Follow @BlurBusters on Twitter

       To support Blur Busters:
       • Official List of Best Gaming Monitors
       • List of G-SYNC Monitors
       • List of FreeSync Monitors
       • List of Ultrawide Monitors

Post Reply