Gigabyte M32Q Review

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Discorz
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Gigabyte M32Q Review

Post by Discorz » 28 Oct 2021, 15:44

Image


GIGABYTE M32Q Review


Table of Contents
  1. Specifications
  2. Responsiveness
    • Sample-and-Hold Performance
      • TestUFO - Overdrive 'Balance', 60-170 FPS
      • TestUFO - Overdrive 'Picture Quality', 60-170 FPS
      • TestUFO - Overdrive 'Smart', 60-170 FPS
      • TestUFO - Overdrive 'Speed', 60-170 FPS
      • Overdrive 'OFF'
      • Response Times
    • Blur Reduction - Aim Stabilizer
      • Hints
      • TestUFO - Middle Screen, Overdrive 'Balance', 100-170Hz
      • TestUFO - Middle Screen, Overdrive 'Picture Quality', 100-170Hz
      • TestUFO - Strobe Crosstalk, Overdrive 'Picture Quality', 100-170Hz
      • Duty Cycle
      • Animation - Aim Stabilizer Waveform Estimate 170-100Hz
      • Red KSF Phosphor
    • VRR Blur Reduction - Aim Stabilizer Sync
      • Hints
      • Smooth Frog - Middle Screen, Overdrive 'Picture Quality', 170 FPS
      • Smooth Frog - Middle Screen, Overdrive 'Picture Quality', 144 FPS
      • Smooth Frog - Middle Screen, Overdrive 'Picture Quality', 120 FPS
      • Smooth Frog - Middle Screen, Overdrive 'Picture Quality', 100 FPS
      • Smooth Frog - Middle Screen, Overdrive 'Picture Quality', 85 FPS
      • Smooth Frog - Middle Screen, Overdrive 'Picture Quality', 60 FPS
      • Smooth Frog - Strobe Crosstalk, Overdrive 'Picture Quality', 85-170 FPS
      • Animation - Single Pixel Line Panning Across the Screen, Strobe Crosstalk
      • Duty Cycle
      • Animation - Aim Stabilizer Sync Waveform Estimate, @170Hz 170-60 FPS
      • Animation - Aim Stabilizer Sync Waveform Estimate, @120Hz 170-60 FPS
      • Animation - Aim Stabilizer Sync Waveform Estimate, @85Hz 170-60 FPS
      • Animation - Aim Stabilizer/Sync at Fixed Refresh Rates, @170, 120, 75Hz
    • Input Lag
  3. Other
    • Uniformity
    • Colors
    • Boot Times
    • Factory menu


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Last edited by Discorz on 02 Apr 2022, 14:50, edited 3 times in total.
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Re: Gigabyte M32Q Review

Post by Discorz » 28 Oct 2021, 15:46

1. Specifications
  • Size: 31.5"
  • Resolution: 2560x1440 (16:9)
  • Pixel Density: 93 ppi (0.273 mm pitch)
  • Refresh Rate: 165 Hz (170 Hz OC)
  • Panel Type: IPS (Innolux M315KCA-E7B)
  • Bit Depth: 8+FRC
  • Gamut: P3
  • Adaptive Sync: AMD FreeSync Premium (G-SYNC Compatible also works)
  • Blur Reduction: Aim Stabilizer, Aim Stabilizer Sync
  • Inputs: HDMI 2.0 x2, Display port 1.2 x1 (capable for HDR), USB Type-C x1
  • Price: $360-500 US (October 2021)
Last edited by Discorz on 28 Oct 2021, 15:56, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Gigabyte M32Q Review

Post by Discorz » 28 Oct 2021, 15:47

2. Responsiveness

  • Sample-and-hold Performance
    • Default VRR Range: 48-170Hz
    • Overdrive: 5 levels (OFF, Smart OD, Picture Quality, Balance, Speed)

      Pursuits bellow are taken with FreeSync enabled. Fixed, VRR ON, VRR OFF refresh rates have the same overdrive behaviour! I used Custom Resolution Utility (CRU) for custom resolutions, automatic (PC) timing preset.

      View images in full resolution for detail! (3345 x 2250)

      Overdrive Picture Quality
      Image
      Image
      TestUFO at ∼960pps, Picture Quality
      Image
      HUB 3-97% gamma corrected
      Heatmaps by HUB: 170Hz, 144Hz, 120Hz, 100Hz, 85Hz, 60Hz
      Heatmaps by RTINGS: 170Hz, 120Hz, 60Hz

      'Picture Quality' is set and forget option for full 48-170 fps range with no overshoot. Compared to 'Balance' it only fits 13% of transitions within refresh window. But there is no much ghosting. 'Picture Quality' and 'Balance' are the only two reasonable overdrives on this monitor, other ones are basically useless. Something in between those two would be ideal.


      Overdrive Balance
      Image
      Image
      TestUFO at ∼960pps, Balance
      Image
      3-97% gamma corrected
      Heatmaps by HUB: 170Hz, 144Hz, 120Hz, 100Hz, 85Hz, 60Hz
      Heatmaps by RTINGS: 170Hz, 120Hz, 60Hz

      Hardware Unboxed measured 16% of overshoot ranked yellow, but for this panel 16% is not bad at all as you can see from pursuit shouts. Overshoot is subtle and it won't be noticed in games. Also it nicely fits most of the transitions (92%) within refresh window. 'Balance' is my recommendation for 120-170 fps gaming. So if u game at low frame rates consider other overdrive.

      M32Q uses Low Framerate Compensation (LFC). So one trick you do could here to tame the overshoot at lower refresh rates is modify VRR range from default 48-170 to something like 85-170. With this modification as soon as fps dips bellow 85 the display driver starts doubling the refresh rate and it stays in sync. Meaning internal panel refresh stays high and overshoot gets cut in half. You can do this with Custom Resolution Utility (CRU by ToastyX).


      Overdrive Speed
      Image
      Image
      TestUFO at ∼960pps, Speed
      Image
      HUB 3-97% gamma corrected
      Heatmaps by HUB: 170Hz
      Heatmaps by RTINGS: 170Hz, 120Hz, 60Hz

      Gigabyte decided to include one setting with extreme amount of overshoot just like majority of gaming monitors on the market. If coronas bother you avoid this one.


      Overdrive OFF

      There is also OFF option which actually doesn't fully disable overdrive. I noticed some very small amounts undershoot. But you have to try really, I mean really hard to notice it. So we don't get to see panel's native performance. For those who are interested how pursuit shots look it's extremely similar to 'Picture Quality'.

      Image
      HUB 3-97% gamma corrected
      Heatmaps by HUB: 170Hz
      Heatmaps by RTINGS: 170Hz, 120Hz, 60Hz


      Overdrive Smart OD
      Image
      Image
      TestUFO at ∼960pps, Smart OD
      Image
      HUB 3-97% gamma corrected, Smart OD
      Heatmaps by HUB: 170Hz, 144Hz (Balance), 100Hz, 60Hz (Balance)
      Heatmaps by RTINGS: 170Hz, 120Hz, 60Hz

      Gigabyte seem to be the first to include Smart OD that is supposed to be variable overdrive without using nvidia's overpriced g-sync module. Unfortunately they didn't do it right for M32Q. 'Smart OD' is just choosing between existing overdrive modes. For 170-120 fps range it uses 'Balance', for 120-75 fps 'Speed', 75-50 fps 'Balance', 48-37 'Speed'. This means if fps is limited to 120 you will see overdrive flickering because the display is trying to switch between one light and one aggressive level of overdrive. Obviously this is very distracting and for that reason I don't recommend using this. I will give credit to Gigabyte for implementing such thing. Smart OD has great potential, but it needs to be fixed!

      My fix would look something like this: slightly less aggressive Balance for 145-170Hz, same Picture Quality for 48-85Hz and 2 new well tuned overdrives in-between instead of uneffective OFF and Speed modes.

      Image
      Smart OD fix

      Ideally a really good implementation of this type of variable overdrive requires much more levels of overdrive, preferably in 0-100 increments (gain) so that transitions turn out silky smooth.


      Response Times

      All data you see here is taken from Hardware Unboxed and arranged a bit different.

      Image
      M32Q response times and overdrive comparison throughout full refresh range, data taken from Hardware Unboxed, method 3-97% RGB gamma corrected

      Random monitors for comparison.

      Image
      Response times and overdrive comparison between multiple monitors, data taken from Hardware Unboxed, method 3-97% RGB gamma corrected

      If you'd like to know how these numbers look in real life use my TestUFO Collection for demonstration or comparison.

      This next bar graph shows Persistence + Average Response Times + Overshoot.

      Image
      Best overdrive at max refresh rate and few non-native 60Hz, data taken from Hardware Unboxed, method 3-97% RGB gamma corrected
Last edited by Discorz on 21 Apr 2022, 10:37, edited 9 times in total.
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Re: Gigabyte M32Q Review

Post by Discorz » 28 Oct 2021, 15:47

  • Aim Stabilizer
    • Phase Adjustment: NO
    • Pulse Width Adjustment: NO
    • Maximum Brightness: ∼100 nits (OSD brightness ∼15) | Brightness Adjustment: NO
    • Overdrive Adjustment: 5 levels
    • Fixed Refresh Rate Range: 100-170Hz

    View images in full resolution for detail! (3345 x 2250)

    Overdrive Balance
    Image
    TestUFO at ∼960pps, Aim Stabilizer at middle screen, overdrive 'Balance'

    Overdrive Picture Quality
    Image
    TestUFO at ∼960pps, Aim Stabilizer at middle screen, overdrive 'Picture Quality'

    Strobe Crosstalk
    Image
    TestUFO at ∼960pps, Aim Stabilizer fullscreen strobe crosstalk, overdrive 'Picture Quality'
    • Duty Cycle:
      1. Baclight ON for 1.0-1.6 ms, main pulse
      2. Backlight OFF, KSF phosphor decay
      Image
      M32Q Aim Stabilizer pulse estimated
      I can't be sure if the yellow timing line is correct here.

      Notice how primary pulse gets a little wider as fixed refresh rate decreases. In theory this would mean it would get much darker at lower refresh rate but it doesn't, stays perfectly consistent. I'm not sure why is that.
    • Red KSF Phosphor

      So how does the slow KSF phosphor look in games? Well it kinda looks like faint red overshoot, not very pleasant, but it's not too bad either. It's just unnecessary. Sometimes I can notice it when I blink or look around the screen or when powering monitor on/off. Here is high speed camera footage of strobed KSF display at "960" fps. I think it should be less distracting on higher refresh rates like 240Hz+ since phosphor decay is shorter due to faster update. Note that slow phosphor is only visible with blur reduction enabled (Aim Stabilizer/Sync). Because of this whole image will have a reddish tint which can be partially removed with few tweaks.

      Image
      Slow red phosphor with Aim Stabilizer/Sync at @170Hz 170 fps, middle screen, Call of Duty 2 in Smooth Frog, pan right-left at ∼1920pps

      Interestingly Aim Stabilizer turns on instantly, I mean no black screens whatsoever, fast as a toggle. But enabling Aim Stabilizer Sync (FreeSync enabled) takes about 2 sec. To make both toggle fast use Custom picture profiles instead. One profile with enabled and other with disabled Aim Stabilizer Sync. Add picture profiles to joystick shortcuts and switch between from there. Or even better use Gigabyte's OSD Side Kick with customizable keyboard skortcuts.
Last edited by Discorz on 06 Apr 2022, 05:52, edited 7 times in total.
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Re: Gigabyte M32Q Review

Post by Discorz » 28 Oct 2021, 15:47

  • Aim Stabilizer Sync

    Hardware Unboxed comment on Aim Stabilizer Sync in their M32Q review got me real excited. Although they said it's not perfect, it was still the main reason why I bought it.

    Quote Hardware Unboxed:
    "Both Aim Stabilizer and Aim Stabilizer Sync appear to deliver similar results. This is the first monitor that appear to use the same strobing technique at a fixed or variable refresh rate...
    It does work with adaptive sync enabled and does strobe appropriate to dynamic refresh rate...
    However it's not without it's flaws. There is still some strobe crosstalk at pretty much all refresh rates leading to a faint double image and small amount of blur...
    It's not a perfect implementation..."


    They also warned about red KSF phosphor.

    • Phase Adjustment: NO
    • Pulse Width Adjustment: NO
    • Maximum Brightness: ∼100 nits (OSD brightness ∼15) | Brightness Adjustment: NO
    • Overdrive Adjustment: 5 levels
    • Variable Refresh Rate Range: 75-170Hz
    • Fixed Refresh Rate Range: 75-170Hz (60Hz in bug mode)

    Since TestUFO doesn't work with adaptive sync we can't use it for VRR testing. We need an actual game or better something like Smooth Frog for pursuit shots.

    View images in full resolution for detail! (3345 x 2250)

    170 FPS
    Image
    Smooth Frog at ∼1440pps, Aim Stabilizer Sync middle screen, @170Hz 170Hz/170FPS, overdrive Picture Quality

    144 FPS
    Image
    Smooth Frog at ∼1440pps, middle screen, @170Hz 144Hz/144FPS, overdrive Picture Quality

    120 FPS
    Image
    Smooth Frog at ∼1440pps, Aim Stabilizer Sync middle screen, @170Hz 120Hz/120FPS, overdrive Picture Quality

    100 FPS
    Image
    Smooth Frog at ∼1440pps, Aim Stabilizer Sync middle screen, @170Hz 100Hz/100FPS, overdrive Picture Quality

    85 FPS
    Image
    Smooth Frog at ∼1440pps, Aim Stabilizer Sync middle screen, @170Hz 85Hz/85FPS, overdrive Picture Quality

    60 FPS
    Image
    Smooth Frog at ∼1440pps, Aim Stabilizer Sync middle screen, @170Hz 60Hz/60FPS, overdrive Picture Quality

    Below minimum range of 75 fps Gigabyte decided to disable strobing. It goes back to VRR sample-and-hold mode while keeping the brightness consistent. This toggle shift can be noticed in games. I assume they did this to avoid flickering at such low framerates.

    Strobe Crosstalk
    Image
    Smooth Frog at ∼1440pps, Aim Stabilizer Sync fullscreen strobe crosstalk, @170Hz 85-170Hz/FPS, overdrive 'Picture Quality', 6690 x 4500

    By inspecting pursuit shots of single pixel white line panning across the screen we can see what is Gigabyte really doing here.

    Image Frame by Frame
    M32Q Aim Stabilizer Sync fullscreen strobe crosstalk, overdrive OFF
    single pixel line panning across the screen at ∼1440pps (right-left), RGB 63-255-63,


    And with a little help of our monitor specialist Ashun we managed to estimate what's the pulse logic behind Gigabyte's Aim Stabilizer Sync.

    Quote Ashun (from Aperture Grille):
    "Gigabyte is doing something very similar to ASUS’s first attempt with ELMB-Sync like on the VG27AQ, but they’re doing it backwards. They begin with a very high frequency PWM backlight fill that expands/contracts based on the current framerate, and then they add in the “primary” or “real” backlight pulse, which has the same duration for any framerate. The PWM fill is just there to keep the brightness consistent from frame to frame. Otherwise the screen brightness would be constantly changing. This strategy might work OK-ish for really high framerates, where you might not notice the PWM fill, but at lower framerates, it becomes very visually distracting and unacceptable."


    What this means is Aim Stabilizer Sync is a single strobe, but when its combined with high frequency PWM backlight fill it looks just as bad as double strobe. And on top of all this you get the annoying red KSF phosphor.
    • Duty Cycle for 170Hz:
      1. Variable high frequency PWM backlight fill (0-6.6 ms)
      2. Backlight OFF for 1.7 ms, KSF phosphor decay
      3. Baclight ON for 1.0 ms, main pulse
      4. Backlight OFF for 3.2, KSF phosphor decay
    @170Hz
    Image
    M32Q estimated Aim Stabilizer Sync pulse @170Hz

    @120Hz
    Image
    M32Q estimated Aim Stabilizer Sync pulse @120Hz

    @85Hz
    Image
    M32Q estimated Aim Stabilizer Sync pulse @85Hz

    Quote Ashun (from Aperture Grille):
    "But a good question is: why is the red fringing in front of the pulse? Think of the KSF phosphor as a secondary backlight that stays on and keeps emitting even after the backlight strobes are finished. So at the beginning of where the blue LCD response starts rising, the glowing red KSF phosphor begins to show. That’s why it leads the main image!"

    Image
    Single pixel line panning across the screen (right-left) at ∼1440pps, @170Hz 120Hz/120FPS, Aim Stabilizer Sync middle screen, overdrive OFF

    M32Q can do single strobe @75Hz minimum, but this is achievable only with fixed Aim Stabilizer Sync refresh rates. Basic Aim Stabilizer will do down to only 100Hz. If you use this and your fps drops bellow 75 Aim Stabilizer will disable it self permanently and stick since it is already bellow minimum (75 fps) value, this seems to be a bug. Current (fixed) refresh rates you set your monitor to will always be single strobed.

    This leads us back to Hardware Unboxed confirming it strobes appropriate to dynamic refresh rate. They must of tested this with TestUFO which can't work with adaptive-sync, only with fixed refresh rates.

    Image
    Single Pixel Line at ∼1440pps, Aim Stabilizer/Sync Middle Screen, Overdrive OFF
    It can do 60Hz single strobe in bug mode.

    Notice how primary pulse gets a little wider as fixed refresh rate decreases. I measured around 1.0ms @170Hz, 1.2ms @144Hz, 1.3ms @120Hz, 1.5ms @ 100Hz, 1.6ms @85Hz and 1.7ms @75Hz.
Last edited by Discorz on 02 Apr 2022, 13:41, edited 4 times in total.
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Re: Gigabyte M32Q Review

Post by Discorz » 28 Oct 2021, 15:48

  • Input Lag

    Since I don't have any devices to measure input lag I've used humanbenchmark reaction time test to see what numbers say. I got surprised by how good input lag is. Very close to VG279QM, they are in the same category. These are an average number of many many tests, around 50-60 tests per result, so it should be accurate enough. Here is how that looks. For me ∼200 ms is bad, ∼150 ms is best it can get.

    Image
Last edited by Discorz on 28 Oct 2021, 15:59, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Gigabyte M32Q Review

Post by Discorz » 28 Oct 2021, 15:48

3. Other
  • Uniformity

    Normal viewing distance, IPS glow and backlight bleed
    Image

    Backlight bleed only, realistic
    Image

    Backlight bleed only, exaggerated
    Image

    There is some amount of backlight bleed but I never noticed it in normal use scenarios.

    Pixel Structure and Anti-Glare Coating
    Image Image
    from rtings
  • Brightness
    • Maximum Brightness: 354 nits
    • Minimum Brightness: 62 nits
    Since Hardware Unboxed tested maximum brightness of 354 nits at setting of 100 and minimum of 62 nits at 0, we can try to assume what is the brightness at other settings.

    Image
  • Color Performance

    I don't care too much about colors and don't have any tools to do proper measuring. Will say its way better experience compared to VG279QM. Watch these reviews for color performance:

    Hardware Unboxed: https://youtu.be/tS7HYqepUZI?t=635
    RTINGS: https://www.rtings.com/monitor/reviews/gigabyte/m32q
  • Boot Times

    Here is a benchmark you've never seen before. VG279QM's annoyingly slow boot times inspired me to do this. In fact VG was so slow that it was a bottleneck to my fast M.2 SSD and windows boot times. Windows would boot a couple seconds faster than monitor. This led to win boot logo being completely skipped. M32Q doesn't have such issue and it was a refreshment.

    Image

    U can disable boot logo in factory menu and that cuts on time significantly.
  • Factory menu

    Image

    Here is a how to open guide.
Last edited by Discorz on 02 Apr 2022, 14:05, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Gigabyte M32Q Review

Post by Verneclover » 14 Nov 2021, 19:08

Hello, nice review!
Did you notice some problems with inversion artifacts? I am considering this monitor to buy, but I have worries about inverse artifacts problems, because I have seen post of M32Q owner on Reddit about inverse artifacts problem.

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Re: Gigabyte M32Q Review

Post by Discorz » 16 Nov 2021, 12:14

Verneclover wrote:
14 Nov 2021, 19:08
Hi

From which monitor are you upgrading?

TN panels are much more prone to inversion, but you shouldn't be worried too much about this with IPS. To notice you really need to look for it. For example refresh rate would have to be at anything bellow ∼120Hz and mouse movement needs to be extra slow (1ppf) to start noticing inversion in games.

I tried to capture it with camera but couldn't so I simulated exact amount for you. It actually turned out spot on.
Note that this is worst case scenario at 60Hz, as refresh rate increases it disappeares. At 120 its already gone plus its only visible at parts of the screen, mainly middle.

Watch in full resolution for true 1:1 pixel
ps 60hz inversion simulation m32q crop.png
ps 60hz inversion simulation m32q crop.png (864.62 KiB) Viewed 9510 times
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Re: Gigabyte M32Q Review

Post by Verneclover » 16 Nov 2021, 20:54

Discorz wrote:
16 Nov 2021, 12:14
Verneclover wrote:
14 Nov 2021, 19:08
Hi

From which monitor are you upgrading?

TN panels are much more prone to inversion, but you shouldn't be worried too much about this with IPS. To notice you really need to look for it. For example refresh rate would have to be at anything bellow ∼120Hz and mouse movement needs to be extra slow for you to start noticing inversion in games.

I tried to capture it with camera but couldn't so I simulated exact amount for you. It actually turned out spot on.
Note that this is worst case scenario at 60Hz, as refresh rate increases it disappeares. At 120 its already gone plus its only visible at parts of the screen, mainly middle.

Watch in full resolution for true 1:1 pixel

ps 60hz inversion simulation m32q crop.png
Hi! Thank you for your answer with the excellent illustration. I am updating from AOC q3279vwfd8 (it is also 31.5", 1440p, IPS, but only 75hz) - it doesn't have inverse artifacts. Do these lines appear only during movement or u can see them on static image too? And if u can notice them on static image, do they have dynamic or static nature? I mean , if you watch on static image, could u notice that these lines have some movement/walk ?

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