Got an old g-sync monitor.Can response time degrade?

Talk about NVIDIA G-SYNC, a variable refresh rate (VRR) technology. G-SYNC eliminates stutters, tearing, and reduces input lag. List of G-SYNC Monitors.
Post Reply
wiseude
Posts: 18
Joined: 27 Jan 2019, 12:42

Got an old g-sync monitor.Can response time degrade?

Post by wiseude » 16 Oct 2020, 15:13

I noticed on my 144hz monitor whenever I move my mouse pointer on a white background it tends to have this subtle blurr/vibration to it.It's subtle so most might not notice it.Also noticed it on a black background the same thing kinda happens and the mouse pointer kinda becomes almost watery (like the white insides of the mouse pointer can't be contained by the outline of the mouse pointer itself) Again,can be subtle so most might not notice.

I also noticed the issue becomes more obvious at 60 hz https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sRsP5jh ... e=youtu.be See how its splitting when moving it left and right?

To make sure it wasnt just me I went on a laptop with 60hz and mouse movement there doesn't have that wierd vibration/mouse splitting (atleast nowhere near as obvious as on my monitor)

Monitor in question is an aoc g2460pg 144hz G-sync monitor.The issue persisted multiple clean OS installs/driver installs so I'm leaning on it being possibly the monitor itself.

On another thread someone else told me that since I seem to notice less mouse vibration/blur on the 60hz laptop it means that it has better response time then my current G-sync monitor so is it possible that response time on a monitor can degrade over time?


UPDATE:Also tried changing DP cable but nothing changed.

I also tried doing the frame versus test https://www.testufo.com/framerates-versus and I could not get it to synch most of the time and it kept juggling between 130-140 (for some reason I couldn't get a 144fps/144hz on this test)

Also did the mouse strobe test https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S04uHO57cgc
Last edited by wiseude on 19 Oct 2020, 14:11, edited 3 times in total.

User avatar
Chief Blur Buster
Site Admin
Posts: 8077
Joined: 05 Dec 2013, 15:44
Location: Toronto, Ontario, Canada
Contact:

Re: Got an old g-sync monitor.Can response time degrade?

Post by Chief Blur Buster » 16 Oct 2020, 21:34

First, make sure you warm-up the panel for a few hours. Stored panels take time to break in, especially if they've been boxed with foam pressing against the screen. Next, do a Factory Reset. The picture settings can affect pixel response speed (overdrive settings, etc).

Extended break-in helps too. If the monitor was stored for a long time in a box lying on its side, then its pixel speed and contrast (GtG) may be permanently impaired from the pressure effect (the same pressure effect from pressing a finger on an LCD screen). But regardless, you can run it hot as possible (48-72 hours 24/7 at brightest brightness nonstop while playing a full screen video loop) to loosen up and redistribute all those glass-sandwiched liquid crystal display (L.C.D.) molecules as much as possible. Sometimes a full week break-in is all you need. Turn off the screensaver & disable sleep completely, shine it bright all week long at 100% Brightness with continuous picture activity. Don't do this for OLED, but this is useful for breaking-in a new LCD or a long-stored old LCD.

Finally, is it winter in your country? Pixel response is slow when cold. Desktop monitors tend to respond slower in cold rooms in the middle of the winter. Just like forgetting a watch/screen/smartphone outdoors in freezing weather -- the screen can respond slowly -- that's the GtG slowdown from temperature. It can even happen at smaller scales with just 2 to 5 degrees lower room temperature.
Head of Blur Busters - BlurBusters.com | TestUFO.com | Follow @BlurBusters on Twitter

       To support Blur Busters:
       • Official List of Best Gaming Monitors
       • List of G-SYNC Monitors
       • List of FreeSync Monitors
       • List of Ultrawide Monitors

wiseude
Posts: 18
Joined: 27 Jan 2019, 12:42

Re: Got an old g-sync monitor.Can response time degrade?

Post by wiseude » 17 Oct 2020, 13:50

Chief Blur Buster wrote:
16 Oct 2020, 21:34
First, make sure you warm-up the panel for a few hours. Stored panels take time to break in, especially if they've been boxed with foam pressing against the screen. Next, do a Factory Reset. The picture settings can affect pixel response speed (overdrive settings, etc).

Extended break-in helps too. If the monitor was stored for a long time in a box lying on its side, then its pixel speed and contrast (GtG) may be permanently impaired from the pressure effect (the same pressure effect from pressing a finger on an LCD screen). But regardless, you can run it hot as possible (48-72 hours 24/7 at brightest brightness nonstop while playing a full screen video loop) to loosen up and redistribute all those glass-sandwiched liquid crystal display (L.C.D.) molecules as much as possible. Sometimes a full week break-in is all you need. Turn off the screensaver & disable sleep completely, shine it bright all week long at 100% Brightness with continuous picture activity. Don't do this for OLED, but this is useful for breaking-in a new LCD or a long-stored old LCD.

Finally, is it winter in your country? Pixel response is slow when cold. Desktop monitors tend to respond slower in cold rooms in the middle of the winter. Just like forgetting a watch/screen/smartphone outdoors in freezing weather -- the screen can respond slowly -- that's the GtG slowdown from temperature. It can even happen at smaller scales with just 2 to 5 degrees lower room temperature.

First, make sure you warm-up the panel for a few hours:
I've been using this monitor for 5 years now and never boxed it.The Issue started a year ago and the issue persists even after 10+ hours of the pc being on.Also factory reset does nothing but make inverse ghosting worst since it reverts the Overdrive setting to normal.(I have to resort to put it to "light" to reduce the inverse ghosting but the blur/vibrating mouse when moving it around stays regardless)

Extended break-in helps too:
Was never stored.Was always in use for 5 years straight 10+ hours a day.

Finally, is it winter in your country?:
Issue is just as visible in the summer as in the winter.

wiseude
Posts: 18
Joined: 27 Jan 2019, 12:42

Re: Got an old g-sync monitor.Can response time degrade?

Post by wiseude » 19 Oct 2020, 14:14

Chief Blur Buster wrote:
16 Oct 2020, 21:34
First, make sure you warm-up the panel for a few hours. Stored panels take time to break in, especially if they've been boxed with foam pressing against the screen. Next, do a Factory Reset. The picture settings can affect pixel response speed (overdrive settings, etc).

Extended break-in helps too. If the monitor was stored for a long time in a box lying on its side, then its pixel speed and contrast (GtG) may be permanently impaired from the pressure effect (the same pressure effect from pressing a finger on an LCD screen). But regardless, you can run it hot as possible (48-72 hours 24/7 at brightest brightness nonstop while playing a full screen video loop) to loosen up and redistribute all those glass-sandwiched liquid crystal display (L.C.D.) molecules as much as possible. Sometimes a full week break-in is all you need. Turn off the screensaver & disable sleep completely, shine it bright all week long at 100% Brightness with continuous picture activity. Don't do this for OLED, but this is useful for breaking-in a new LCD or a long-stored old LCD.

Finally, is it winter in your country? Pixel response is slow when cold. Desktop monitors tend to respond slower in cold rooms in the middle of the winter. Just like forgetting a watch/screen/smartphone outdoors in freezing weather -- the screen can respond slowly -- that's the GtG slowdown from temperature. It can even happen at smaller scales with just 2 to 5 degrees lower room temperature.

Strobe test look fine to you ? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=S04uHO57cgc my mouse at 60hz looks very similar to 72hz (like the mouse is gonna split in 2 when moving it left and right)

Post Reply